Hot answers tagged

18

The owners would implement a salary cap in a New York Minute if they had the opportunity. The players, however, would not agree, and because MLB is so successful monetarily even without one, and also has one of the most powerful players unions, the owners don't have the power to force it on them. It's not hard to find articles about how the MLB owners ...


13

Baseball There is a long history of college teams playing against MLB teams in spring exhibition games. This WSJ article has a good description of it: Such was the unusual spectacle of the Phillies’ 6-2 loss to the University of Tampa, a Division II school. It was a sight only possible in Major League Baseball, the lone major U.S. sport with a long-...


12

According to UmpiresMedia.com, getting a “head start” is considered illegal in professional baseball. Actually, it is listed in the rules you linked Rule 5.09(c)(1) Comment (Rule 7.10(a) Comment): “Retouch,” in this rule, means to tag up and start from a contact with the base after the ball is caught. A runner is not permitted to take a flying start ...


11

This has happened before, most notably the Grand Slam Single of the 1999 NLCS. The Braves and Mets were tied 3-3 in the bottom of the ninth. The Mets loaded the bases, and Robin Ventura crushed a grand slam. He was mobbed at first base, and never touched second. Only Cedeno, the runner on third, actually touched home. Ventura was awarded a single, and the ...


11

Simple answer, the MLB and the MLBPA don't want a salary cap. It isn't proven that a salary cap would make things any more competitive. In terms of data, in the NBA for example, it has seemed to make things slightly less competitive. In the past 30 years, 19 different teams have won the World Series. In comparison, only 14 different teams won the NFL ...


11

Both are. The left logo is the official team logo since 1968. The right one with the letters NY is the more famous one, because it's way older and they still use it on the caps and jerseys. This iconic logo has been introduced in 1915 and was the official brand logo until 1946 and has been used on the team wear ever since. In 1947 the Yankees introduced ...


10

A few that come to mind: The "neighborhood play" at second base, where the fielder doesn't actually touch second base during a double play attempt. Batters going to first base if a pitch that they made no effort to get out of the way of hits them. According to the rules, a batter must attempt to get out of the way of a pitch. An outfielder using the wall ...


10

This is banned explicitly in the 2008 rules (only ones I could find, and may have been replaced since the new CBA was issued, but I'm going to go out on a limb that this particular section's language has not changed). (i) PLAYER LOANS. (1) Prohibited at Major League Level. All right or claim of a Major League Club to a player, unless it is under ...


10

Five pitchers have done it. This ESPN article from April 14, 2012 lists the following three occurrences: 10 -- Tom Seaver, N.Y. Mets vs. San Diego, April 22, 1970 9 -- Ricky Nolasco, Florida at Atlanta, Sept. 30, 2009 9 -- Aaron Harang, L.A. Dodgers vs. San Diego, April 13, 2012 Then on September 27, 2012, Doug Fister of the Detroit Tigers struck out 9 ...


10

The man on 2nd is only out if: The 3rd baseman tags third, which would make him out by force-out or The 3rd baseman tags the player. If the man on 2nd decides to not run to third, then he would only be out by one of those two options. It's only a force if you tag the base the runner is required to go to by rule. 3B's claim is incorrect; the runner on ...


10

The Baseball-Reference.com Batting Game Finder has data going back to 1903. To get the list of pitchers who have hit home runs in the postseason, make the following setting changes on that page: select "Find Players with Most Matching Games in Multiple Years" select "Postseason" for "Batter's Defensive Position", make sure ...


9

This was actually a fairly tough on to dig up. As you mention in your question, the East and West swapped back and forth, and until 1985 the AL and NL were in sync. However something happened in 1985. Change came to the playoffs. The LCS were changed from 5 games to 7 and in addition the commissioner decided that the AL and NL would go to opposite divisions ...


8

The pitcher must choose first, then the batter. They are each allowed one change per plate appearance. See this wikipedia link for some background.


8

Veterans playing minor league games is a standard part of the disabled list procedure. While a player is on the disabled list, he is eligible to play minor league games for up to 20 days (30 days for pitchers) on a rehabilitation assignment, after which he either needs to be reinstated or a waiver process must be completed in order for him to continue ...


8

Major league players, managers and coaches are required to abide by strict uniform guidelines. They are required to be in uniform, but can also wear other team apparel on top to stay warm. However, some managers have elected not to comply and wear just a team pullover for various reasons. MLB can and does check and fine repeat offenders. Terry Francona's ...


8

The basic formula for WAR is as follows: WAR = (Batting Runs + Base Running Runs + Fielding Runs + Positional Adjustment + League Adjustment +Replacement Runs) / (Runs Per Win) Different sources will have different ways of calculating these values. Baseball Reference (ESPN's source) uses: bWAR: RS (Runs Scored) = Runs per Win + (mwRAA (a modified ...


8

No he doesn't. Pitcher errors are counted alongside other defensive errors and are treated the same for the purpose of determining ERA. If a run scores as the result of an error, it doesn't matter who committed it, that run is not counted for ERA. This is explicitly covered by the rules, as well. MLB's Official Baseball Rules (OBR) 2015 edition Rule 9.16(e)...


8

The data are not generally publicly available, at least not yet. The stuff that is available can be found here:http://baseballsavant.com/pitchfx_search.php. I don't know how "permanent" it is. You can read a lot about Statcast at my own web site: http://baseball.physics.illinois.edu.


8

Both the runner who interfered and his teammate (the batter) are out, and any other runners cannot advance. 6.01(a)(6): If, in the judgment of the umpire, a base runner willfully and deliberately interferes with a batted ball or a fielder in the act of fielding a batted ball with the obvious intent to break up a double play, the ball is dead....


8

The answer is basically No, though there is no official statement of teams many articles I have read so far points out teams does not provide new jerseys to the players for every game. Uniforms are washed, mended and pressed to look as new every game. From a article of CNN: Mitch Poole, clubhouse manager for the Los Angeles Dodgers "uniforms used to be ...


7

It's not exactly the problem you pointed out in your OP, but the Toronto Maple Leafs (NHL team) have an ongoing dispute with one of their players from 1960-1975. The leafs have a policy of honouring jersey numbers rather than retiring them, where a banner is raised to the rafters in honour of the player, but future players can still wear the number. Given ...


7

It's entirely up to the umpire's discretion: An INFIELD FLY is a fair fly ball (not including a line drive nor an attempted bunt) which can be caught by an infielder with ordinary effort, when first and second, or first, second and third bases are occupied, before two are out. The pitcher, catcher and any outfielder who stations himself in the ...


7

Whether or not it's a bunt or some other hit doesn't really make a difference. From the official rules: 6.06 A batter is out for illegal action when -- (a) He hits a ball with one or both feet on the ground entirely outside the batters box. Rule 6.06(a) Comment: If a batter hits a ball fair or foul while out of the batters box, he shall be called out....


7

The answer to this question is Kaz Matsui in 2004 for the New York Mets with 125 hits. The next best are Tommy Harper of the Seattle Pilots with 126 in 1969, Deon Sanders of the Reds in 1997 with 127. And finally rounding out the top 5 are Lou Whitaker and Luis Polonia For the 89 Tigers and 90 Angels respectively with 128 each. My analysis determines that ...


7

All Major league baseball players are paid at a daily rate equivalent to their annual salary; that daily rate is calculated based on the Championship Season, which is defined as the time from Opening Day to the final day of the "regular" season (so, usually around Sept. 30). It is between 178 and 183 days in length. So, if the player is paid $1MM, and this ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible