8

I can't watch the video either, but yes, the full diameter counts and not where the ball touches the ground. Simply said, if you look straight down on the ball and it still touches the line it is in: One of the rules covering said situation: Law 15, Throw-In (...)when the whole of the ball passes over the touchline, on the ground or in the air. ...


4

There are quite a few fouls that can happen at the start of a down: False Start: Movement of an offensive player prior to the snap, e.g. a lineman changing their stance or a receiver moving forward. Encroachment: Movement of defensive player into the neutral zone prior to the snap who then touches an opponent or the ball. Neutral Zone Infraction: Movement ...


4

Not really, no. Law 3.3, Substitution procedure says if a player who is to be replaced refuses to leave, play continues indicating that the referee has no power to enforce a substitution, and further is required to ignore an unsuccessful attempt rather than wait for the conflict to be resolved. Law 3.7, Extra persons on the field of play says If a ...


4

No. Advantage should not be played for an offence which will result in a red card, regardless of what the reason for that red card is, unless there is an immediate goalscoring opportunity for the opponent of the offending player. See Law 12, part 3 of the IFAB Law Of The Game. Emphasis is added. Advantage should not be applied in situations involving ...


4

One simple answer: VAR. As it is still a new technology, referees are unsure of the extent they should review decisions. In the past, when VAR was not used, referees were free of blame (to some extent) as the decision had to be made on the spot. However, as they are now allowed to review any major decision, they are now being criticized for not using it ...


3

Law 5.4 states that the VAR uses replay(s), so there is no limitation in what sort of replays are being used. Usually all with a proper perspective on the scene. The assistance from the video assistant referee (VAR) will relate to using replay(s) of the incident. When you watch the live footage of the VAR or referee in the review area you can clearly ...


3

It's impossible to give an exhaustive answer here, but here are some of examples of behaviour where a referee may elect to caution a player for unsporting behaviour for shows a lack of respect for the game: using provocative, derisory or inflammatory (but not offensive, insulting or abusive) language or gestures against another person, smoking or otherwise ...


3

These two paragraphs are a little unclear, so the only way I can attempt to answer these is with an appeal to authority. I'm a qualified football referee instructor, and this answer is how I would expect a referee to interpret and apply the above two paragraphs. I must note that situations like this are extraordinarily rare, so the lack of clarity in these ...


2

When judging a run out the best position is viewed as being level with the popping crease and in position to see the wickets being broken as well, at the end the ball is being thrown. Now lots of umpires including me suggest that at times a better view is gained by being at a 45 degree angle with the batsmen running towards you and the line. This is best ...


2

In short, body checking in women's hockey is prohibited while body checking in men's hockey is not. In essence, while the act of body checking is self-explanatory, a Woman's Body Check denotes an illegal act while a Body Check denotes the act itself, which is common in men's hockey. Rule 604 in USA Hockey states: Body checking is prohibited in the 12 &...


2

No. A red card means that the player is out for the rest of the game. In youth football timed suspensions are possible (at least here they are), but they replace the 2nd yellow card and another yellow card after that suspension is no longer possible. Any offense that would lead to one results in a direct red card. However, there were situations in the past ...


1

Pitching position is determined by the actual ball on a flat surface. To the extent that an error exists, it consists of a pixel on a screen. For the ball hitting the pads, it is not possible to reliably say from current camera angles the height at which the ball hit the pads, and therefore the error is large enough to be applied. For the ball hitting the ...


1

The referee could going back but only after a shortest time after foul is committed. It's not an official rule. It's left to the discretion of the referee


1

To quote the Official Rules, page 35: 14.5 BLOCKING THE SERVICE 12, D11 (12) To block an opponent's service is forbidden. "D11 (12)" is diagram 11 "Referee's official hand signals", signal 12 (page 74): Blocking fault or screening Raise both arms vertically, palms forward i.e. the standard signal for an illegal block.


1

In short: The rulebook has changed since the World Cup was played. This years Women's World Cup is being played under the 2019/20 Laws of the Game which have some significant changes from the previous 2018/19 edition. In particular, Law 14 Penalty Kicks now says that The goalkeeper must have at least part of one foot on/in-line with the goal line when ...


1

So that only really applies to an interception or a fumble into the endzone, because the play is automatically over if an offensive player has possession of the ball in the endzone. So, if you are a defensive player and intercept the ball or pick up a loose fumble and instead of kneeling down, you try to return the ball, but fumble in the endzone, the only ...


1

The runner would be awarded home plate on the overthrow, however, the runner would be out on appeal (if the fielding team appeals) for missing second base. The runner could return and touch second base on the dead ball before touching 3rd and home, in order. But once the runner touches 3rd base, if they missed 2nd then they would be out on appeal. If the ...


1

Offside: A defender crosses the Line of Scrimmage before the snap (without touching an opponent). Encroachment: Offside, but with touching an opponent. Neutral zone infraction: This is basically the same rule as offside, but will usually be called when a defender causes an offense player to false start by committing an offside foul or a defender already ...


1

Offside. All what matters is the relative position of ball and receiver (forward) at the time of the pass. The rules do not specify anything about the direction of the pass. From Law 11 of the FIFA Rules: Offside position A player is in an offside position if- he is nearer to his opponents’ goal line than both the ball and the second-last opponent. A ...


1

Penalties are not reviewable, except for number of players on the field before the snap. See the NFL rulebook.


1

According to the very same case 3.14 stated in the casebook 2018, it is not a fault. Apparently, the FIVB has corrected the decision if it was different in 2017.


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