31

Yes, they can. Example: During the 2012 UEFA Champions League final, Manuel Neuer of Bayern Munich took a penalty against Chelsea, when the game went into penalties. Please refer this wikipedia link. Also, when a game is being decided by penalties, then all players must have taken one penalty each, before a player can take a second penalty. So, a goal ...


31

This is due to the advantage rule, From Laws of the Game - Law 5: The Referee - 3. Powers and Duties: The referee allows play to continue when an offence occurs and the non-offending team will benefit from the advantage and penalises the offence if the anticipated advantage does not ensue at that time or within a few seconds. The referee allowed to ...


29

The accepted answer is great but I might add that in kicks from the penalty mark to decide a winner, all eligible players need to have taken a kick before a player may take a second kick. This means that the goalkeeper not only can take a kick, but must take a kick before any of the other players take a second kick.


19

On page 55 of the 2014/15 FIFA Laws of the Game, in the Kicks from the Penalty Mark procedure, it says Unless otherwise stated, the relevant Laws of the Game and International F.A. Board Decisions apply when kicks from the penalty mark are being taken. This means that, since no other description is given, Law 14 (governing Penalty Kicks during the game)...


18

According to the Law 14 in the IFAB laws of the game: The ball must be kicked forward The penalty taker cannot touch the ball until another player has touched it No player from either team (other than the goalie and the penalty taker) can enter the penalty area or penalty arc until the ball is kicked Assuming Cruyff's teammate didn't enter the penalty area ...


13

Yes, absolutely. There are essentially only two major restrictions on play after a penalty kick: The player taking the penalty kick must kick the ball forward [...] The kicker must not play the ball again until it has touched another player. So long as those restrictions are met, the ball is in play as in normal play and anything goes.


13

The results, as presented on the webpage, are not that surprising. I downloaded the chart of all countries and ran a histogram of the performances (discounting countries that only had 1 or two shootouts, as they are a very small sample size). 54 countries had participated in 3 or more shootouts and here is the histogram. It's a reasonable approximation of a ...


10

It's way higher in soccer than ice hockey. In soccer, a penalty kick is quite close to an automatic goal, averaging around 85% in the English Premier League (source: My Football Facts), whereas in ice hockey, a penalty shot has a conversion rate of around about 30% (source: official NHL stats, via this excellent answer). However, I'm not sure this is really ...


10

Of course it's legal and has happened many times other than the accepted answer's example. E.g José Luis Chilavert used to take penalties that were not even in penalty shoot-outs, as well as free kicks. See: Jose Luis Chilavert's international goals (YouTube).


9

According to the IFAB Laws of the Game, Law 14 - The Penalty Kick, 1. Procedure: The defending goalkeeper must remain on the goal line, facing the kicker, between the goalposts until the ball has been kicked. These kind of incidences actually happen quite rarely, the famous one being Bill Hamid of D.C. United saving 2 attempts from penalty kick in the ...


8

In penalty shootouts in association football, a format of sudden death is followed if after 5 penalty shots each, the scores are still tied. If the number exceeds 11* penalty kicks each without a winner, all players become eligible to take a second penalty kick. The order of penalty kick takers can be changed, but all 11* players must take a second kick ...


8

I shall leave details of the specific clauses that are relevant, and why this situation falls under their jurisdiction. Instead I shall address why you would want to design the rules like this: If you give the foul, then the defending team has benefited from the foul. A foul should never be more appealing than not-fouling. Supposing you implemented the ...


7

Taken from the excellent Penalty Shootout Trivia: In amateur and youth matches probably quite different records have been set; one particular instance went over the world in January 1998: a match for the Derby's Community Cup, a competition for nine and ten years old children, between Mickleover Lightning Blue Sox and Chellaston Boys finished 1-1, and the ...


6

From IFAB Laws of the Game, Law 14, part 2, ... play will be stopped and restarted with an indirect free kick, regardless of whether or not a goal is scored: feinting to kick the ball once the kicker has completed the run-up (feinting in the run-up is permitted); the referee cautions the kicker Thus, feinting during the run-up is permitted, but ...


6

An better example than Manuel Neuer would be Jörg Butt: "Known for taking penalty kicks, he scored 26 goals in the Bundesliga." Source


6

Yes, it is legal - and as someone already claimed, even required if all other players have taken theirs. To give some examples: Manuel Neuer converted a penalty for Bayern Munich against Real Madrid (?) in the Champions League quite recently. There are also goalkeepers who take penalties during the game, such as Hans-Jörg Butt, who converted a penalty for ...


6

He leaves the goal line right when the shot is taken. This is quite normal behavior and accepted by the referees. It is very hard to see and the referee also has to watch the other players when they try to go after the ball too early, which makes it even harder. While he's not standing exactly on the line (which is tolerated to some extent.. the referees ...


6

There are likely two possible reasons this technical breach of the Laws was not penalised. The offence was so minor that the referee was unable to detect it. The referee applied his discretion under Law 5, Section 2, Paragraph 1, deciding that it would be inappropriate to penalise such a minor offence with a caution and retake. Law 5, Section 2, Paragraph ...


5

You won't find any law against it because it is completely legal. It is a bit of a stretch see how this could be a problem. Any controversy here would most likely arise from the goalkeeper placing the ball on an uneven section of turf in order to impair the kicker. If this was to happen, the kicker is then within their rights to place the ball however they ...


4

I'm not sure if it's the team record, but Martin Palermo (in)famously missed three penalties for Argentina in a Copa America game against Colombia in 1999. Here is the YouTube video of the incident. There's detailed information for penalty shootouts at rsssf.com.


4

The first penalty shoot out that England had was against West Germany at Italia 90. England of course lost. Peter Shilton was the England keeper, who at exactly 6 foot tall is smaller than most keepers. His tactic in that penalty shoot out was to dive after the ball had been struck (rather than the usual method of picking a side). He dove the correct way ...


4

Beyond a high school varsity player cannot kick as hard or as accurate is that the high school player would be much more apt to give away kick positioning through their body language, strike approach, and certainly their leg/torso positioning on a follow through. As a goalie in soccer for 15 years and some for a top 25 high school I can say that there are ...


4

I finally found it! It was in Campeonato Paulista 2001 (Site in Portuguese). There are some stuff that was a little bit blurry on my head: I had the feeling that they would perform the shootout before the game. Penalty shoot-out was actually after the game, only if the game was tied which makes much more sense. Otherwise the result of the shootout would ...


3

I cannot find a quote directly from the NHL, but there are tons of articles online that talk about the rule change. The main reason that is mentioned over and over is: The puck technically has to be moving forward during the penalty shot or shoot out attempt and removing the spin-o-rama will close the grey area for the referees. As Senior Writer for NHL....


3

It was in 1988 when the CBF instituted the Lei dos Pênaltis (law of penalties). Apparently it was for the Brasileirão (national championship) according to this article that cites Vitória, América, Botafogo and Fluminense, which are from different states, as teams who had to go through the penalty shootout to define the winner of the extra point.


3

Apart from players already mentioned in the question (Zamora, Martins, Brehme), I couldn't find anyone else who scored penalty-kicks with both feet in top level football (let alone in top European leagues). But, I have something juicier for you! Simone Verdi has scored 2 free-kicks in one game with both feet for Bologna F.C. 1909, in a Serie A match of the ...


3

(e) is what would happen. There's no reason this would be interpreted any differently than the rules regarding a power play; in particular: 24.6 indicates that only one goal can be scored or awarded at a single stoppage of play, but the own-goal was scored prior to a stoppage of play (it was the cause of the stoppage of play; the play had continued due to ...


3

Law 7.4, from the IFAB Laws of the Game, states If a penalty kick has to be taken or retaken, the half is extended until the penalty kick is completed. Thus, the referee should blow the whistle to end play when the kick is completed. Law 14.1, from the same source, states The penalty kick is completed when the ball stops moving, goes out of play or ...


3

Here's another interesting one: In 1989, referee Kelvin Morton awarded five penalties in a Crystal Palace v Brighton game, a Football League record. Palace were awarded four of the penalties, missed three but still won 2-1. Source from Wikipedia Here is the YouTube link of match highlights. P.S: a tricky google search like missed 4 penalties or ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible