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Most Major League starting pitchers have between three and four different kinds of pitches that they can throw throughout the game. Examples are Fastabll Changeup Slider Curveball Cut Fastball Kunckleball The break and speed of these pitches vary quite dramatically so it's important for the catcher to know what's coming. The reason that a pitcher has so ...


13

You're not alone; sometimes even the commentators, who have the same "over-the-shoulder" long-lens view that the folks at home do, will simply refer to a pitch as a "breaking ball" if it drops sharply or curves outside, even though a number of specific pitches can do that. The fundamental theory of pitching is that the batter gains an advantage over the ...


12

There are two ways to deliver a pitch from the mound: The windup The stretch Most pitchers will pitch out of the windup when there are no runners on base. It usually helps with the pitchers rhythm. They are able to use a high leg kick and deliver a pitch. Some relievers will pitch out of the stretch whether or not there is a runner on base. This is ...


10

The pitcher has the final decision, since he is the one throwing the pitch. Before every game, the pitcher, catcher and pitching coach meet to discuss pitching strategies. They already have an approach before the batter steps into the batter's box. The catcher then signals the pitcher (sometimes, the coach will signal the catcher first). This is primarily ...


9

Here are some things to look for while watching on television: Speed Movement - the general direction the ball is moving Break - a sudden shift in direction it's also possible sometimes to tell from arm position and angle but most professionals (even those on the bench) are good enough to make every pitch look the same in terms of ...


8

All balls in play are counted as strikes. This is a basic principle of pitching. If the batter swings at the pitch, it's a strike. This gives us 2 categories of pitches that are counted as strikes: balls in the strike zone that are not swung at balls that are swung at There is only one category of pitches categorized as balls: balls that are not swung ...


8

I'm interested as to why you think the stretch is more advanced than the wind-up. It seems to me like the wind-up includes much of the stretch mechanics (roughly speaking) but with a lot of extra movements involved. The fact that these kids don't have to actually worry about base runners should actually simplify things in learning the stretch delivery. ...


7

This is basically one of the million dollar questions in sports today: Why are pitchers getting hurt more now than ever before? Nobody knows the answer, but here are a couple theories: Athletes are bigger and stronger than ever today. They lift more weights, maintain better nutrition, and have access to technology and knowledge that has never ...


6

The "home plate" is an unusual construct, that is rectangular in front (two corners), and becomes a triangle in back (one corner). Here, "corner" refers to the two front ones. "Inside" is in relation to the batter. A right handed batter will stand to the left of the plate, so that his "inside" corner is the (left) corner closer to him, and the "outside" (...


6

You've got it right. Payoff pitch basically means that there's going to be a result. It does preclude a foul ball, which can extend the at bat, but foul balls can extend other at bats that are not in "pay-off pitch" position, for example an 0-2, 1-2 or 2-2 count. The term refers more to the situation (3-2) than the pitch itself. 3-2 is a "payoff" situation ...


5

Here's 3 quick things to keep in mind The pitcher can decline the given sign, in which case the catcher will have to give another sign. Since different pitches behave differently, the catcher needs to know what pitch is being called so he can compensate. Passed balls are never a good thing. It has to be the catcher that calls the sign, because that's the ...


5

If the pitcher signaled the pitch then the hitter would see - that is your answer. Whether the pitcher, catcher, or coach decides ultimately on what gets pitched is really up to the coach. I caught for years and always called my games. When my backup came in the coach called some. Also the coaches will decide if the pitcher can waive them or the catcher ...


5

A catcher who knows how to properly call a game is essential to any team who hopes to win. As said above, there is a simple finger system that they use to communicate. But there is so much more that goes into deciding what pitch to throw next. Every team has a scouting report that lists every hitter's tendencies, strengths and weaknesses. This is ...


4

The catcher is the one to make the call because the sign can be easily stolen if done by the pitcher directly. Secondly, the catcher also needs to give the sign to the pitcher to pick off any runners on base if any as the catcher is the only player that can see the entire infield and outfield. This doesn't necessarily mean the catcher makes all the ...


4

I have played Division 1 baseball, and I was recruited to play both infield (SS) and pitch, so I have a little experience for this question. Frankly speaking, the glove is all about preference by the player. Personally, I hated breaking a glove in. I felt as though breaking it in (even though it makes catching a lot easier) really broke down the fabric ...


4

This would depend on many factors. Some of those: How comfortable is the closer pitching more than one inning? Many are fairly comfortable, many are not. How often has the closer pitched recently? How high a leverage situation is this? 7,8,9 guys coming up? Or 1,2,3? How rested is the rest of the bullpen? If this goes 17, am I going to regret not ...


3

4 thousandths of a percent...ish. 6 swings and misses on 6 pitches in a row against the same pitch. For that we should talk about whiff%. As a commenter points out, it's very difficult to answer this in the general case as each pitcher is very different in how they get outs (some are strikeout pitchers, other are contact pitchers, some pitchers generate ...


3

There are TONS of pitchers that try to throw with multiple arm angles. Some of the all time greats excelled at doing this. The reasons you don't see it a lot more: most pitchers need a ton of practice to do that and they don't have enough arms to get in 100 pitches a few times a week at multiple angles. the non fastball pitches are really hard to ...


3

WPA (Win Probability Added) does what you are looking for, although with some limitations. WPA takes the difference in win expectancy for each team for each play and assigns it to the pitcher (for the defense) and the batter (for the offense). Since both pitching and hitting components are measured, a pitcher's contributions both on the mound and at the ...


3

As you've stated pitcher A gets the loss. Here is the rule from the MLB official rule book: 9.16(g) When pitchers are changed during an inning, the official scorer shall not charge the relief pitcher with any run (earned or unearned) scored by a runner who was on base at the time such relief pitcher entered the game, nor for runs scored by any ...


3

First of all 10% of the population are left-handed, but amazingly 25% of baseball players are left-handed. This 2.5 times than average isn't randomly, This fact helps proving that left-handed baseball players has an advantage in baseball. We need to distinguish between 2 claims: First one is that Left-handed pitchers have an advantage in baseball. ...


3

First here is a quote from the BBWAA about voting for the MVP: Dear Voter: There is no clear-cut definition of what Most Valuable means. It is up to the individual voter to decide who was the Most Valuable Player in each league to his team. The MVP need not come from a division winner or other playoff qualifier. The rules of the voting ...


3

Pitches add up. Depending on other factors, you can greatly reduce the likelihood of a future arm injury if you throw more than 110 pitches in a game. Each pitch a pitcher throws puts an enormous amount of stress on their body and thus there are limits to the amount that a human can throw on a given day at max effort without increasing their risk of ...


2

The major reason players pitch on four days rest is that they are better pitchers when they do so. They are able to throw harder, throw more pitches, and throw more difficult pitches (with more spin/etc.) than they would if they had less rest. They are also less prone to injury. Some evidence exists that pitching on three days rest in the postseason (...


2

"Player of the Game" (joking). There is no ACTUAL stat for what you are asking, it is just a great game played by the pitcher. The pitcher can get offensive stats for "walk offs", and they can get defensive stats such as a "win" towards their pitching stats. But there is not a stat that combines the pitcher's offensive and defensive performance.


2

A save cannot 'change' as it is defined as finishing the game. A hold does not change, either; if reliever A pitches a clean 8th inning, before and after his team leading 4-2, and then reliever B comes in and serves up a grand slam, reliever A still receives credit for a hold. As far as wins, the winning pitcher is defined as the pitcher who was the ...


2

I am currently a collegiate pitcher that throws from both submarine and a 3/4 arm slot. I'd say I mix in the 3/4 delivery only about 15-20% of my pitches in game. It is really effective if you have a difference of speed above 7 or 8 mph. The biggest problem with it at higher the higher level however is that you must have the same leg lift and stride and only ...


2

I would say that the biggest shift recently has been to specializations and the bullpen. Before, you had a starter that would just throw all 9 innings where now you have starters throwing 6 or 7 innings with a setup man leading to the closer. You also have situation guys like a lefty specialist that can come in to face lefties and more middle-relief guys ...


1

To extend your point, being able to "switch-pitch", that is, pitch with both your right and left arm, would be even more confusing to batters. And be able to throw from multiple arm angles with both arms!! Okay, enough sarcasm. Honestly, the reason is that most pitchers, biomechanically, have an arm slot that works for them to produce velocity, accuracy, and ...


1

During the 2018 MLB season, Jordan Hicks had the two fastest pitches recorded at 105.1 and 105.0 mph. Outside of several Chapman pitches and two pitches by Tayron Guerrero, Jordan Hicks dominated the first page of results of MLB Statcast's list of fastest pitches.


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