Hot answers tagged

9

No, this is not legal. Quoting from the Table Tennis England Rules of the game: Strike – 2.5.7 – A player strikes the ball if he touches it in play with his racket, held in the hand, or with his racket hand below the wrist. (my emphasis) and Procedure – 2.7.1 – The ball, having been served or returned, shall be struck so that it touches the opponent’s ...


7

No you can't change paddles mid game, according to the International Table Tennis Federation Handbook for 2017: 3.4.2.4 A racket shall not be replaced during an individual match unless it is accidentally damaged so badly that it cannot be used; if this happens the damaged racket shall be replaced immediately by another which the player has ...


6

Racquet abuse is not the only offense that can lead to a point penalty in tennis. Kicking a bottle, throwing a bag, or using profanity will often lead to a warning from the chair umpire, if not a point penalty (depending on the number of offenses committed that match). These rules are in place to uphold the integrity and professionalism of the game and to ...


6

I've heard reports of amateur players who are ambidextrous swapping a tennis racket from one hand to the other to have two forehands. I don't know about squash and tennis, but in badminton there's no rule banning moving the racket between your left and right hands. The reason is probably because, except perhaps at beginner level, there's no advantage to ...


6

I realize this is an older question, but I think my answer might be useful to other people with the same or similar questions. Anti-spin rubber can take the spinniest of serves and return it virtually deadened. Several rubber manufacturers create anti-spin rubber. It is designed for exactly what you're looking for, however there are some disadvantages as ...


5

Yes, it is legal to change the racket during play. From the Recommendation to Technical Officials (RTTO) §3.5.4.2: (...) change of a racket at courtside during a rally is permitted. Notice the at courtside: At a tournament, there will be two boxes per side into which the players must put all their stuff. The players are allowed to lay out a new racket on ...


4

I know from experience that it really depends on what kind of table tennis player you are. If you are always defending you should buy a paddle with almost no padding and no grip. But if you are an aggressive player, you need a paddle with lots of grip and as much padding as possible. If you don't know what kind of player you are then ask at the sports shop ...


4

From my personal experience, it can be a distraction for the opponent. She / he might already be totally focused on the next point, and an opponent destroying his racket will not only be noisy, but also take extra time to get ready for the next point. Also, smashing a racket into to ground could damage some types of courts, e.g. clay or grass, which could ...


4

Rule 2.04.01 of the ITTF rules and regulations states The racket may be of any size, shape or weight but the blade shall be flat and rigid But Rule 2.4.4 states that the rubber covering may extend up to but not beyond the limits of the blade


4

Although there is no restriction on racket size, shape or weight there are restrictions for rubber covering the racket. From ITTF rules and regulations handbook 2017, Rule 2.4 The Racket 2.4.3 A side of the blade used for striking the ball shall be covered with either ordinary pimpled rubber, with pimples outwards having a total thickness including ...


4

Regulation 3.02.01 states that only table tennis rubbers authorized by the International Table Tennis Federation (ITTF) can be used in authorized events. You must ensure that you attached them to your blade so that the ITTF logo and the maker's logo or trademark are clearly visible near the edge of the blade so that they can be checked by the umpire.


3

I think there is no correct reply always true for this question, but I bolted the most one according to your image. Anyway you can use this hint to understand the meaning of the points: Point 1 is the Center of Percussion (COP in your image) and offers the least amount of initial shock to the hand when struck. Shock is generally accepted as being ...


3

This article has what you are looking for. Essentially the grip size is the circumference of the octagonal section of the handle. So just take a piece of string wrap around your old racquet and then measure the length of one string's worth around.'s The article goes into depth on this, but a rule of thumb is the proper grip size allows you to comfortably ...


3

It is possible to lengthen your racquet (at least the handle/grip) - however, you don't want to attempt it yourself unless you really know what you're doing. I would recommend looking into a service such as what is provided by RPNY where racquet customization professionals can do the modification to your racquet. I've tried playing with a 28.5" racquet ...


3

I'll try my best to answer your question - I don't quite understand what you're asking when you say punches their racquet's strings and changes the racquet after that If you are a beginning tennis player, the rule of thumb is that you should restring your racquet as many times in a year as you play in a week. So if you play twice a week, you should get ...


3

Lead Tape This is the best solution there is. Having read this racket review from Paul Stewart about making a racket more head-heavy, I immediately ordered some tape: The tape comes with a self adhesive side, allowing you to stick it everywhere. According to the description, 4 inch / 10 cm would yield approximately 1 gram. Usage I chose the following ...


3

Rules of TT: 2.5.2 The ball is in play from the last moment at which it is stationary on the palm of the free hand before being intentionally projected in service until the rally is decided as a let or a point. 2.5.5 The racket hand is the hand carrying the racket. 2.5.6 The free hand is the hand not carrying the racket; the free arm is the arm ...


2

The previous answer sums up the aspects of buying a squash racket very well, but here are some additional thoughts. What has to be recognized when buying a squash racket is that it's very personal, and it depends a lot on your strengths/weaknesses as a player, as well as your level. The problem with buying a racket as a beginner is that it's hard to ...


2

Regarding squash, it is perfectly alright to switch your hands while playing a shot. You can use both your hands too. Here is a video which shows that it is allowed.


2

Not sure where anyone got the information that higher/lower tension changes the size of a sweet spot. It's the racquet head size and the number of strings. (Definition of a sweet spot is the most efficient power generated with the least amount of vibration) That said, I found an interesting article published by a Dr. at the University of Sheffield (http://...


2

Choosing an overgrip typically depends on a few different factors: Moisture (sweat) absorption - how well the overgrip stays dry when your hands are sweating. Tackiness - how "grippy" the overgrip feels in your hand when you first put it on your handle. Durability - how long the overgrip stays good and doesn't start wearing out or tearing after a certain ...


2

Try a thin layer of black charcoal dry lubricant (Home Depot has them in a spray can.), test it and see if it's slippery enough (it would not smear after it drys in 3-5 min. Tape/cover the areas you don't want to cover. Use it on the black side only or your want the red side to turn black. To remove wipe with WD40, it will be a bit messy.


2

In general, I think the grip you use on any of your shots might be a little different depending on whether you're an advanced player or a beginning player. The "choke up" grip shown in that video on volleys looks fine and probably helps beginning tennis players have a more firm wrist (and therefore more racquet head stability) on their volleys. I don't use ...


2

You can definitely do this in table tennis. Andrej Grubba, a Polish table tennis pro used to do this quite often. Recently I have seen Timo Boll doing this in a real match. The Chinese players don't do this during the match because their coaches will not be happy.


2

Elmer's Rubber Cement is the classic glue for Table Tennis Blades. But it is no longer legal for tournaments. If you glued within a week you will likely fail the sniff test for VOCs (solvents). Water based glues are what you are supposed to use now. Tear Mender, YES Paste and Elmer's no Drip School Glue are common choices now.


2

Each racket is distinguished by the following characteristics: weight balance hardness Weight A lighter racquet allows greater ease and speed of movement. However, for hitting the shots, a light racquet requires greater effort on the the arm. Otherwise, a heavier racquet offers more power on the ball, without affecting the arm as much as a light ...


2

I find anything that doesn't leave fibres on the rubber works. I often just use a paper towel.


2

I generally don't recommend a heat-shrink sleeve because it's a rather "permanent" solution to your problem. If you find that the heat-shrink sleeve doesn't solve your problem you're out the cost of the heat-shrink plus the time and energy it takes to get it on/off. Instead, just try adding a second overgrip - you can put the second overgrip either under ...


2

Here is How I did it: Buy a decent Wilson kid's racquet, 250g or so with a thin handle, other brands may have different core shapes that might be difficult to work with. Remove the wrap of the handle and the butt cap. Cut off about 3 inches of hardened glue from the bottom of the handle, expose the metal or carbon fiber core inside. Buy a piece of square ...


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