Hot answers tagged

8

No, this is not legal. Quoting from the Table Tennis England Rules of the game: Strike – 2.5.7 – A player strikes the ball if he touches it in play with his racket, held in the hand, or with his racket hand below the wrist. (my emphasis) and Procedure – 2.7.1 – The ball, having been served or returned, shall be struck so that it touches the opponent’s ...


7

There are two rules of thumb to determine your correct tennis racket grip size: Hold the racket by the handle as you would while playing and see if you can insert your your non-dominant index finger in the space between your palm and ring finger tip. If your index finger is snug, the grip is sized correctly. A player can measure his or her grip size with a ...


7

Racquet abuse is not the only offense that can lead to a point penalty in tennis. Kicking a bottle, throwing a bag, or using profanity will often lead to a warning from the chair umpire, if not a point penalty (depending on the number of offenses committed that match). These rules are in place to uphold the integrity and professionalism of the game and to ...


7

No you can't change paddles mid game, according to the International Table Tennis Federation Handbook for 2017: 3.4.2.4 A racket shall not be replaced during an individual match unless it is accidentally damaged so badly that it cannot be used; if this happens the damaged racket shall be replaced immediately by another which the player has ...


6

I realize this is an older question, but I think my answer might be useful to other people with the same or similar questions. Anti-spin rubber can take the spinniest of serves and return it virtually deadened. Several rubber manufacturers create anti-spin rubber. It is designed for exactly what you're looking for, however there are some disadvantages as ...


6

I've heard reports of amateur players who are ambidextrous swapping a tennis racket from one hand to the other to have two forehands. I don't know about squash and tennis, but in badminton there's no rule banning moving the racket between your left and right hands. The reason is probably because, except perhaps at beginner level, there's no advantage to ...


5

Both of the racquets you referenced are made of lower quality materials. They're not necessarily "bad" racquets (especially for a beginner such as yourself) but they differ from higher quality racquets in specific ways such as: They can't be restrung if needed (they will bend/warp during the re-stringing process) They generally are much lighter weight than ...


5

Yes, it is legal to change the racket during play. From the Recommendation to Technical Officials (RTTO) §3.5.4.2: (...) change of a racket at courtside during a rally is permitted. Notice the at courtside: At a tournament, there will be two boxes per side into which the players must put all their stuff. The players are allowed to lay out a new racket on ...


4

At your level of play, the maker isn't nearly as important as the string type and tension. Most popular brands; Head, Wilson, Prince, etc. offer similar rackets for essentially the same price point. (The more expensive rackets are more expensive because they offer a stronger material at a lighter weight.) I'd strongly suggest analyzing your style of play....


4

I know from experience that it really depends on what kind of table tennis player you are. If you are always defending you should buy a paddle with almost no padding and no grip. But if you are an aggressive player, you need a paddle with lots of grip and as much padding as possible. If you don't know what kind of player you are then ask at the sports shop ...


4

It depends on how serious of a player you are and how much you plan to be playing - but you could either buy the rubber by itself and resurface your existing paddle (which requires some amount of knowing what you're doing) or you could go down to your nearest sporting goods store and spend somewhere between $40-60 and get a pretty nice paddle with high ...


4

Most of the basics have been said by Richard. Only I would like to add that an oversized-head racquet can be a really dangerous choice. The mechanics on these types of racquets are simple : most of the weight is concentrated on the head, so while they'll add significant power to your swings (because of the inertia created by your forearm speed), you will be ...


4

On the Badminton World Federation (BWF) website, there are a lot of official documents to be found. You need to go to the second tab (Organisation) on the main site and choose Law & Regulations. After that you need to click on Laws of Badminton (circled red): The document, titled: PART II, SECTION 1 A, LAWS OF BADMINTON, elaborates in chapter 4 on the ...


4

Rule 2.04.01 of the ITTF rules and regulations states The racket may be of any size, shape or weight but the blade shall be flat and rigid But Rule 2.4.4 states that the rubber covering may extend up to but not beyond the limits of the blade


4

Although there is no restriction on racket size, shape or weight there are restrictions for rubber covering the racket. From ITTF rules and regulations handbook 2017, Rule 2.4 The Racket 2.4.3 A side of the blade used for striking the ball shall be covered with either ordinary pimpled rubber, with pimples outwards having a total thickness including ...


4

Regulation 3.02.01 states that only table tennis rubbers authorized by the International Table Tennis Federation (ITTF) can be used in authorized events. You must ensure that you attached them to your blade so that the ITTF logo and the maker's logo or trademark are clearly visible near the edge of the blade so that they can be checked by the umpire.


3

There is a trend right now among tennis players to actually play with a handle that's one size (1/8th) smaller than what size you would arrive at using the methods described in the answer provided by Dirty-flow. This allows for more a little bit easier wrist snap/movement. For example, based on my hand size I should play with a 4 3/8 size grip but I actually ...


3

I'll try my best to answer your question - I don't quite understand what you're asking when you say punches their racquet's strings and changes the racquet after that If you are a beginning tennis player, the rule of thumb is that you should restring your racquet as many times in a year as you play in a week. So if you play twice a week, you should get ...


3

Lead Tape This is the best solution there is. Having read this racket review from Paul Stewart about making a racket more head-heavy, I immediately ordered some tape: The tape comes with a self adhesive side, allowing you to stick it everywhere. According to the description, 4 inch / 10 cm would yield approximately 1 gram. Usage I chose the following ...


3

Racquet manufacturers (for squash, badminton, tennis, racquetball, etc) these days design specs for every racquet using modeling tools on a computer so that they can get detailed measurements to the manufacturers. The grommets have specs just like the racquets do. The space between the holes in the hoop of the racquet must be known and be precise in order to ...


3

It is possible to lengthen your racquet (at least the handle/grip) - however, you don't want to attempt it yourself unless you really know what you're doing. I would recommend looking into a service such as what is provided by RPNY where racquet customization professionals can do the modification to your racquet. I've tried playing with a 28.5" racquet ...


3

This article has what you are looking for. Essentially the grip size is the circumference of the octagonal section of the handle. So just take a piece of string wrap around your old racquet and then measure the length of one string's worth around.'s The article goes into depth on this, but a rule of thumb is the proper grip size allows you to comfortably ...


3

From my personal experience, it can be a distraction for the opponent. She / he might already be totally focused on the next point, and an opponent destroying his racket will not only be noisy, but also take extra time to get ready for the next point. Also, smashing a racket into to ground could damage some types of courts, e.g. clay or grass, which could ...


3

I think there is no correct reply always true for this question, but I bolted the most one according to your image. Anyway you can use this hint to understand the meaning of the points: Point 1 is the Center of Percussion (COP in your image) and offers the least amount of initial shock to the hand when struck. Shock is generally accepted as being ...


3

Rules of TT: 2.5.2 The ball is in play from the last moment at which it is stationary on the palm of the free hand before being intentionally projected in service until the rally is decided as a let or a point. 2.5.5 The racket hand is the hand carrying the racket. 2.5.6 The free hand is the hand not carrying the racket; the free arm is the arm ...


2

The previous answer sums up the aspects of buying a squash racket very well, but here are some additional thoughts. What has to be recognized when buying a squash racket is that it's very personal, and it depends a lot on your strengths/weaknesses as a player, as well as your level. The problem with buying a racket as a beginner is that it's hard to ...


2

Regarding squash, it is perfectly alright to switch your hands while playing a shot. You can use both your hands too. Here is a video which shows that it is allowed.


2

At the end of the day, you just have to feel comfortable with the overall feel of the grip and that it shouldn't move too much (if at all) in your hand. You'll need to try this out for both the forehand, backhand and serving grip (preferably by hitting a tennis ball) because you can also feel the grip against the impact of the ball.


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