14

Because the conversion is taken from a point in-line with where the try is scored, at a distance chosen by the kicker. The important point to note is that a try is not scored "when the player enter in the in-goal area": the try is scored only when the ball is grounded with control in the in-goal area. The kick is obviously much easier if it's done from in ...


13

There is no law stipulating who has to take the line-out throws. To see why it is the Hooker's job, we can consider a process of elimination of the other positions. First, it should not be any of the backs, since they will be needed to execute backline plays (or defend against them) once the ball is cleared from the lineout. Consider then the forwards. ...


9

Law 12 of the Laws of Rugby Union specifically exclude a charge-down that happens immediately following a kick as being called a knock-on or throw forward. I think this has been a law in Rugby for a long time and is not a recent innovation. Before 1958 it was even possible to rush the the kicker and charge down a penalty kick from immediately the time ...


8

Looking at a clip of Robbie Henshaw's try, the following happens: Henshaw jumps for the ball with his right arm, knocking it forward, possibly also with his chest/chin. He then catches it cleanly with his right arm before it hits the floor, grasping it to his chest He falls to the ground and clearly touches it down, as you say. The IRB rule for a knock-on ...


7

I believe this rule was brought in (to rugby league at least) to encourage charge downs. This puts more pressure on the kicker and encourages the tackler to attack the ball, rather than hitting the kicker, who may not be ready for it and could get injured. Another reason to have the chargedown rule is that a successful chargedown can add excitement, check ...


7

The lineout is deemed to be formed when two or more players from each team have assembled within 5-15 metres of the throw-in location. Any player who approaches the touchline is presumed to be part of a lineout. Up to this point, the thrower can opt to take a quick throw-in. Tactically however, and as gbianchi comments, the thrower is unlikely to opt ...


7

Law 11 cover all the aspect about it: Offside and moving forward. When a team-mate of an offside player has kicked ahead, the offside player must not move towards opponents who are waiting to play the ball, or move towards the place where the ball lands, until the player has been put onside. law 11.2 11.2 Being put onside by the action of a team-...


7

Law 20 of the International Rugby Board states the laws regarding the scrum, and 20.1 specifies the forming of the scrum. Amendment 21 to this section states the following: CURRENT LAW 20.1 Forming a scrum (g) The referee will call “crouch” then “touch”. The front rows crouch and, using their outside arm, each prop touches the point of the ...


6

I can 100% confirm these two as being the equal highest from 2009-2013: 2011: Italy v France; 6-18 at 50 minutes; 22-21 (12 points) 2010: Wales v Scotland; 9-21 at 40 minutes; 31-24 (12 points) Data from 2008 and beforehand only shows the half time score and full time score, which may exclude some comebacks that are larger than this, but none exist from ...


6

As written in the comment is not clear what do you mean with "most popular". I can try to reply to the question whinking about popularity like attendance. So according to those sources (guardian and Australian Bureau of Statistics) Australian (rules) Football seems the "most popular" sport in that country. The sources not agreed on all data, but it seems ...


6

In common with many of the major domestic leagues, the World Cup is using the concept of "bonus points" in addition to points for a win or draw. The precise details can be seen in section 1.1.2 of the Tournament Rules: The following number of Match points will be awarded for each pool phase Match: Win 4 points Draw 2 points Loss 0 points 4 ...


5

It has been a problem in the international game since at least the 2007 world cup, when just before the world cup an edict was sent to the IRB referees to police the feed. However they have taken the decision that the straightness of put in falls so low down the priority order that it gets ignored, with only the most outrageous examples being penalised. ...


5

Padding was traditionally not permitted at all, except for scrum caps. Soft, thin shoulder pads covering only the shoulder and collar bone are a relatively new addition to the game, coming along shortly after the transition to professionalism. In World Rugby Regulation 12, which specifies the technical requirements for permitted padding, the introduction ...


5

The referee is shouting 'Use It'. He is asking the team with possession of the ball to use the ball, and (in most cases) warning that if they do not, they will lose possession of it to the other team. Some referees even say 'Use it or lose it'. Under the established laws of the game you most often hear this when the ball is in a maul that is no longer ...


5

I believe the match officials decision is correct under a strict interpretation of the 10-metre law, 11.4(a), since in the video you link to Hooper appears to continue running forwards, rather than attempting to move back behind a line ten metres from the (onside) opposition players until another player puts him onside by moving in front of him. This is ...


4

The reason set replaces engage is because engage is a very awkward word to use. It has two syllables, and worse, the stressed syllable is the second one. The effect is like saying "ready, set, g-Go" in a running race. Because scrummaging is time critical to a matter of milliseconds, a single syllable word is much more efficient.


4

In both cases the defending team would be offered the option of a 22m drop out or a scrum back at the point the kick was taken from. This is the same as for any kick. This would only apply for kicks not at goal. If it had been signaled as a kick at goal both would result in a 22m drop out for the defending team. These scenarios are covered by law 22.8.


4

Since the entire point of the quick-tap penalty at short range is to make it nearly impossible to prevent the attacker crossing the line, the defence has two legal options. Pull back to the line to ensure onside, then group-tackle: this prevents further penalty and provides the best opportunity to either turn over possession for clearance, or slow down the ...


4

In relation to your question on the offside ruling against Michael Hooper, it was a correct (albeit tough) call. My analysis is as follows: In general play, a player if offside if he’s in front of a team-mate who last played the ball. Under Law 11.1(c), when a team-mate of an offside player kicks ahead, the offside player must not move forward until the ...


3

Law 19 covers when a quick throw can be taken as opposed to a lineout. The touch judge or assistant referee should not put his arm up until a quick throw cannot be allowed because of a different ball or the line out is formed. In the description you give above its play on. Also bear in mind that as soon as the line out is formed, the throw in can take ...


3

Given the relatively limited geographical distribution of rugby union, it's not entirely surprising that the top leagues are in the top Test playing nations: Super Rugby in Australia, New Zealand and South Africa; in 2016, expanded to include Argentina and Japan. Top 14 in France. Premiership Rugby in England. Pro14 in Ireland, Italy, Scotland, and Wales; ...


3

In the video you posted you can hear the referee shouting "just a tackle". In doing so he's telling the players that no ruck has been formed and hence there is no resulting offside line. (See Law 16) A ruck is a phase of play where one or more players from each team, who are on their feet, in physical contact, close around the ball on the ground. Open ...


3

This was a change designed to reduce the number of matches which were forced to have uncontested scrums due to not having appropriate players available - rugby union scrummaging is a highly technical activity, and having players not skilled in it attempt it is not allowed due to the risk of injuries involved if the scrum collapses. The original change to ...


3

According to this query on ESPN Scrum, New Zealand has lost 10 times at home since August 26th, 1995 (the beginning of the professional era). The coaches aren't mentioned but can be retrieved from Wikipedia. Team Score Opposition Ground Date Coach =========================================================================== ...


2

The question "Why is a charge down not regarded as a knock on in rugby union?" can be answered as above, by quoting law 12. But my answer to the question relates to the principles of the game as well as the laws. There are two kinds of infringements that can occur on a rugby field, technical and intentional. Technical infringements are usually sanctioned ...


2

Like said before, I think the person throwing the ball is not defined by the rule but rather by natural optimization of tactics. I have been playing in teams where the flanker was throwing the ball in lineout. I would add that there is no limit on the number of players in a lineout, and that all of the players of the team to be part of it. In fact, the ...


2

Your question has been answered above quite correctly. The following points are guidelines as to when a quick throw can be taken. A quick throw is allowed to be taken if all of the following apply: The ball that went into touch is the same ball used for the quick throw The ball has not touched any other person, other than the player about to throw the ...


2

Basically if the player intentionally knocks the ball forwards then it is already a penalty. In fact this penalty is better than the knock on as you get a penalty kick instead of a scrum. 12(e)Intentional knock or throw forward. A player must not intentionally knock the ball forward with hand or arm, nor throw forward. Sanction: Penalty kick. A ...


2

Since the question includes a draw as the result, the biggest deficit is now 24 points. At half-time on Saturday March 16th 2019, Scotland were 31-7 down to England at Twickenham. They overcame the deficit with 31 unanswered points before England scored a converted try in the last phase of the match to draw 38-38.


2

The indication from Nigel Owens was that the English players arriving at the breakdown had gone off their feet. The explanation being that the maul had ended and a ruck had formed and players need to remain on their feet. Watching live I felt that the penalty should have gone to England for the French players not releasing the tackled player and the ball.


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