Hot answers tagged

21

I agree with the accepted answer but there is something else pertinent to point out. In Rugby, the ref has a very simple and commonly used option when a player backchats or abuses him for giving a penalty, which is to march the position of the penalty 10 metres closer to the defenders tryline. This provides a meaningful bonus in territory, or assistance in ...


20

I think it has to do with the traditions. I believe originally rugby was played by the higher class, with a certain upbringing. I have a colleague who works as a part time rugby ref and he's puzzled as to why the ref doesn't send off half of the players in a football game. I, on the other hand, am often puzzled as to how the refs command so much respect in ...


14

Because the conversion is taken from a point in-line with where the try is scored, at a distance chosen by the kicker. The important point to note is that a try is not scored "when the player enter in the in-goal area": the try is scored only when the ball is grounded with control in the in-goal area. The kick is obviously much easier if it's done from in ...


9

I'd say something rarely mentioned about the sports themselves : scoring is low in football, but high in rugby and basket and many others sports. Thus, a small mistake can rarely change the complete outcome of a game in rugby or in basket : to make a team win, the referee generally has to be partial during the whole game ; but in football, a very tiny error ...


8

A deliberate knock on is a penalty as opposed to an accidental knock on that results in a scrum. In the case of a defender batting down a pass, the referee has to judge whether they think the defender was actually trying to catch (intercept) the pass or just trying to knock it down to prevent the pass from being completed. The later is a penalty, you have to ...


7

It is my understanding that the term has military origins. A red zone in military terms is the danger zone, generally close to the enemy (red having been a symbol for danger for a long time). The term is analogous to sport as the last 20/22 is where you are more likely to suffer the danger of conceding to the opponent. I see that Merriam Webster has the ...


7

Australia's National Rugby League (NRL) is played in accordance with the Rugby League International Federation laws, modulo some minor changes outlined in official documents from the Australian Rugby League (ARL). The RLIF law regarding knock-on states, with emphasis added, that [i]f, after knocking-on accidentally, the player knocking-on regains or kicks ...


6

In my opinion you should switch for plastic cleats whenever the field is not muddy. Metal cleats are just a pain on dry fields. It is unconfortable, you can even feel the screws, and feel less stable (when the field is very dry). You wont get much grip compared to plastic cleats. As an open side flanker, you don't need that much grip in the scrum as you ...


6

As written in the comment is not clear what do you mean with "most popular". I can try to reply to the question whinking about popularity like attendance. So according to those sources (guardian and Australian Bureau of Statistics) Australian (rules) Football seems the "most popular" sport in that country. The sources not agreed on all data, but it seems ...


5

In rugby, the ref always comes over to meet the captains of each team before the game so he can identify them on the field. When I first started playing all the older members on my team gave me crazy looks before our first game and ordered all the rookies to never, ever, EVER speak to the ref. If you need to tell him something your captain should relay the ...


5

In rugby union, No. Law 21.5(b) is the relevant one here. 21 Penalty and Free Kicks 21.5 Scoring a Goal from a Penalty Kick 21.5(b) If the kicker indicates to the referee the intention to kick at goal, the kicker must kick at goal. Once the kicker has made the intention clear, there can be no change of the ...


5

According to rugby law 19.8, here are a few things we need prior to taking the lineout: Both teams have same number of players contesting the lineout, who must be in a single straight line Both team contestants must be between the 5m and 15m line from the touch line Team lines must be 1m apart and the throw must be made straight in that 1m channel ...


5

Short answer: Yes, this is legal. No, it's not a maul (and it wouldn't matter if it were). Tackle? The requirements that you've listed are the conditions under which an attempted tackle becomes a completed tackle. When you attempt to tackle someone, you're required to do so safely but it's not a requirement that you do so successfully - otherwise missing ...


5

As a referee, having looked at that it's not at all illegal. It is the equivalent of a dummy, where the player pretends to pass but doesn't. The reasons for disallowing this would be if either player obstructed the opposition, which they don't. If the dummy occurred at a scrum, it is penalised by a free kick under Law 19.38.f.


3

In union, no. Law 8.25 states: Any player who intentionally touches the ball in an attempt to prevent a penalty goal being scored is illegally touching the ball. Assuming the penalty is not scored, the sanction is another penalty 10m in front of the original location (8.27). This law was brought in after some teams did exactly what you describe and ...


3

15-a-side Rugby Union was included in the 1900 (Paris), 1904 (London), 1920 (Antwerp) and 1924 (Paris) Olympic Games, but as would be expected for that age there was only a men's competition. The gold medals in 1920 and 1924 went to the United States team. http://www.rugbyfootballhistory.com/olympics.htm#usa1924


3

It was stopped back in 1924, but it appears to be back: http://usarugby.org/2016-rio-olympics


3

"There are four threequarters: two wingers and two centres. Right wing (2), right centre (3), left centre (4) and left wing (5). Typically these players work in pairs, with one winger and one centre occupying each side of the field." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rugby_union_positions#Three-quarters Essentially if you are already familiar with the centre ...


2

From Wikipedia (as linked by Orangecrush) The area is not literally colored red and the term is used mainly for statistical purposes As far as I can tell, the etymology is that they needed a name, and "red zone" sounded cool. Nothing particularly special or notable.


2

A pushover try cannot be scored under-19 or below. Similarly, a penalty try from a scrum cannot be awarded because a pushover try was never a possibility. As you've worked out, because a scrum must begin centred 5m from the try line, the 1.5m push limit prevents a pushover try. note: there's also an under-19 law which forbids a team from deliberately ...


2

Don Biglia's comment is pretty much spot on - the soccer team just plays somewhere else, or not at all, when the stadium is in use for the Rugby World Cup. To take a couple of examples: Villa Park was used for rugby matches on the 26th and 27th September. Aston Villa played away at Liverpool on the 26th September. City of Manchester Stadium will be used for ...


2

Does this hold true even today, with AFL teams in Sydney, Brisbane and the Gold Coast, and an NRL team in Melbourne? Yes. Out of the 18 AFL teams, four of them are north of the Barassi Line - Sydney, GWS, Brisbane, and Gold Coast. Let's look at the common metrics of popularity used for sports teams to see how they fare: Crowds Average home crowd in 2019 [1] ...


2

Rugby laws can be confusing at times and the latest law book runs to 146 pages. It doesn't help that some of the terminology commonly used isn't completely consistent with the law. For example, Law 14 defines a tackle as follows - REQUIREMENTS FOR A TACKLE For a tackle to occur, the ball-carrier is held and brought to ground by one or more opponents. ...


2

As a very brief history: 1845: the first rules of "rugby football" are written down. 1871: The Rugby Football Union (RFU) is formed. This is the same body as today's RFU which governs rugby union in England. (1880: as well as the union vs league split, 1880 is when the American versions of the game moved from contested scrummages to an uncontested line of ...


1

Frankly, they're pretty much completely different games. Football is a light contact sport where your primary skill is playing the ball with the feet, or stopping the opposition playing the ball with their feet; rubgy is a full contact sport where your primary skill is carrying the ball, or stopping the opposition carrying the ball. Both sports obviously ...


1

...replacing a back with a loose forward, etc. The closest thing I ever saw to this was Pierre Spies. He played schoolboy rugby on the wing and became a forward relatively late in his playing days. This meant that he was a forward that had the speed of a wing, The bulls would often use him as a huge backline player in that famous team of 2009. That was ...


1

Possibly the most extreme system comes from Chess, and the McMahon competition format. The idea behind big drops in those instances are to ensure that competitors are, as often as possible, meeting evenly matched competitors. How often large adjustments in seeding, ranking and match-pairing are made in team sports, I cannot say.


1

Receiving big money contracts is certainly one of the benefits of switching codes. In the last ten years or so, players switching between codes have received multi-million dollar contracts for doing so, and before even playing a professional game in their "new" sport. Most players though that have switched in recent years have reached the pinnacle of their ...


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