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As a Packer fan I remember the situation and recall that at the time this happened there was no rule demanding the coin to actually flip. Here is a video of Dean Blandino VP of officiating at the time explaining the situation, that by rule the coin didn't actually have to flip, but common sense dictated that it should in order for the flip to be fair. And ...


5

Going off of the 2019 NFL Rulebook - Rule 8, Section 2: Intentional Grounding: ARTICLE 1. DEFINITION It is a foul for intentional grounding if a passer, facing an imminent loss of yardage because of pressure from the defense, throws a forward pass without a realistic chance of completion. A realistic chance of completion is defined as a pass that is ...


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Crossing the net with the racket after hitting it on your side is allowed, as laid out in §13.4.2 of the laws of badminton: It shall be a fault, if in play, a player invades an opponent's court over the net with racket or person except that the striker may follow the shuttle over the net with the racket in the course of a stroke after the initial point of ...


2

As long as they are part of the playing XI (including any made concussion substitutes), they should be able to bowl, as there does not appear to be any rules stating against this. From the ICC T20I Playing Conditions*: Only nominated players in the match (including activated concussion replacements) may participate in the Super Over. Should any player (...


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ImClarky has the rule established for grounding but this has nothing to do with your question. Simply either Wikipedia or your interpretation of Wikipedia is incorrect. A receiver who steps out of bounds (let's clearly talk about NFL since this varies in high school and college) IS AN ELIGIBLE RECEIVER. A receiver stepping out of bounds does not ...


2

The current rules of darts, as established by the Darts Regulation Authority, can be found here. The PDC refers to them on their Rules of Darts page. The rules state the following: 5.4.2 A scoring dart is counted by reference to the segment into which the point of the dart enters and remains in or touching the face of the dartboard. Now, what is a ...


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In both scenarios only a Field Goal is required to win the game. This is because it is deemed that the receiving team in both instances has had their opportunity to possess the ball. From the 2019 NFL Rulebook: Rule 16 - Section 1 - Article 3 Article 3. Extra Period [...] (e) The opportunity to possess applies only during kicking plays. A ...


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I wasn't entirely sure, so I asked in our local community about this question. Most of it got confirmed, but there's a few more things you can do as a referee in such a situation. Talk to the captain of the team in question and remind them to take the free kick. You can caution the captain, if they're not listening or still refuse to continue the game. Give ...


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Yes, they will continue, even if all players have taken a penalty kick. The procedure is described e.g. here on Wikipedia: If after five rounds of kicks the teams have an equal number of successful kicks, additional rounds of one kick each will be used until one team scores and the other misses. This is known as sudden death.


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There is no stated purpose for requiring four hash marks along the free throw key. In fact, it is up to the arena's discretion for where exactly they are placed. The only requirement involves how far away the hash marks are from the foul line and the baseline. The NBA rule book states: Four hash marks shall be drawn (2” wide) parallel to the baseline on ...


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In the NFL and presumably in most football leagues, the goal lines, yard lines, and hash marks are all four inches wide. Inbound lines are that way, but the goal lines are eight inches wide. The hash marks/yard lines are painted at 36-inch intervals; that is, they are 32 inches apart so that they mark exactly one yard each. Easy enough. However, ...


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