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5

In NFL statistics, a blocked extra point is counted as an extra point attempt, so long as the end result is no points scored for the kicking team. From the NFL Guideline for Statisticians: Whenever a player placekicks or dropkicks a ball in an attempt to score an extra point, he shall be credited with an extra-point attempt and, if the kick results in a ...


4

The umpire (not the referee) is in charge of the scoring. Players can announce the score to their partner or even their opponents, but that is not binding in any way. It's hard to prove a negative, but you can peruse the official Laws of Badminton and won't find any mention of a fault of incorrect scoring. The following laws could apply to a talking player: ...


4

I think you are mistaken about how the Strength of Schedule tiebreaker works. When ranking teams, there are a series of tiebreakers that are used. Tie breaker number 6 is "Strength of Schedule," and it is indeed the team with the higher Strength of Schedule that is ranked above a team with a lower Strength of Schedule. I think where you might be ...


2

Two different rules could actually apply here, and neither mentions "forward" fumbles being advanceable anywhere in the current rulebook. First is the rule for Fourth Down Fumbles, Rule 8.7.5: If a fourth-down fumble occurs during a play from scrimmage: (c) If the recovery or catch is by a teammate of the player who fumbled, the ball is dead, and ...


2

Football's rules originally defined the goalkeeper as "the defending player who was closest to their own goal line". Having a player who was specifically the goalkeeper, and held that role regardless of where they actually stood on the field, is a relatively modern concept in the history of football. Therefore, it made no sense to specify "a ...


2

From the 2019 MLB rulebook a BALL is: ...a pitch which does not enter the strike zone in flight and is not struck at by the batter. If the pitch touches the ground and bounces through the strike zone it is a "ball." In the linked pitch, neither of these are true (by my estimation). Whether the catcher catches the ball directly has no bearing on ...


2

Most likely, this is not a foul by either player. Neither player appears to act in a way to meet any of the requirements for a direct free kick that would be relevant, as Law 12, section 1 Direct Free Kick defines the three manners as Careless is when a player shows a lack of attention or consideration when making a challenge or acts without precaution. No ...


2

The only restriction in the Laws of Cricket is that in Law 28.4: At the instant of the bowler’s delivery there shall not be more than two fielders, other than the wicket-keeper, behind the popping crease on the on side. This means you could have 9 fielders on the on side if you wish, so long as 7 of them are in front of the popping crease, or if you wish, ...


1

First the legalities: Rule 6.02 (c)(7) Comment: The pitcher may not attach anything to either hand, any finger out either wrist Second, pitchers may not want to do it. In Football the quarterback is allowed to wear a glove on their throwing hand and the only player that does that is Teddy Bridgewater. Third, don’t worry about safety of the batters because ...


1

This is a 2 parter. First part will be the rule enforcing the call, second will be the reason behind the rule. There is a special rule surrounding fumbles after the 2 minute warning of either half. Article 6. Fumble After Two-Minute Warning of the NFL rulebook states: If a fumble by either team occurs after the two-minute warning: a) The ball may be ...


1

I assume when you say 'corners' you mean the vertical edges of the table rather than the top surface? Firstly it is unlikely that the ball will hit the edge or corner and you won't be able to determine if the ball was in or out, and so I don't think the protectors will make much of a difference here. I have had a table for 10+ years without protectors and it'...


1

Just to clearly link this response to the video, in the first instance (:38) you can see the player in white tries to get out of the way to leave a path to the ball, but just doesn't quite clear out enough. As a result there's a small amount of interference, but it's not really anyone's fault - so Let. In the second instance (:58), white hits then clearly ...


1

No, stumping is not out off a no-ball. But, a runout is valid off a no-ball. How is stumping different? If the batsman attempts to make a run, is outside his crease, and the wicketkeeper takes the bails off, this is a runout. If the batsman is just outside his crease as a followthrough of his shot, and has not made any attempt to run, and if the wicketkeeper ...


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