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1

Another team member moved outside the baseline on the other side of the goal, received the “inbound” pass and dribbled onto the court. This is illegal. Take a look at this video. You will see the following: A Georgia Tech player makes a 3-pointer with 11.7 seconds remaining in the second half. A UConn player goes out of bounds, and picks up the ball to ...


-1

After nomination a player can be replaced at any time during the game.But it has to be with the consent of the opposing captain.


3

Although it might be rare, this play is actually perfectly legal in both the NCAA and NBA (see the link below). Rule 7 Section 6 Article 6 of the NCAA Rulebook does state that: "The thrower-in shall release the ball not more than five seconds after the throw-in count begins. The pass shall go directly into the playing court, except as provided in Rule 7-...


4

A runner is allowed to advance at their own peril whenever the ball is in play. The ball is not automatically dead after completion of a play. But if "time" has been called, then no advance is possible. Usually, the pitcher will control the ball and be standing on the mound while the new batter enters, so advancing is unlikely. If the defense ...


0

In principle, an objectively wrong decision must be a clear and obvious error, as nobody in possession of the facts (and the applicable law) could consider it to be correct. Some reviews require a check of extreme detail to determine whether an objective fact such as offside or handball has been missed or incorrectly observed, and an incorrect decision ...


1

The amount of time it takes to review is somewhat of a pain point with VAR. Soccer involves many people, and their interaction with each others. To review you need to look at a number of angles, and interactions are open to interpretation. In tennis use of Hawk Eye is automatic as the only need to be tracked is the ball. But in soccer you need to take a look ...


0

Don't forget that the VAR people have multiple cameras they need to watch (where I am, in the Netherlands, at least six); a situation may be difficult to judge from all but one angle. It takes a while to review all that footage, especially if the fragments are long (I think that a foul at the very beginning of an attack can already influence whether a goal ...


2

Yes like almost all sports, there's a full list of penalties, otherwise referees wouldn't done what play is a foul or not. In hockey the penalties are split to minor (2 minute) or major (5 minute) penalties. Here is the list of minor penalties: Charging Clipping Closing hand on puck Cross-checking Delay of game Elbowing Embellishment Goaltender interference ...


2

I think the rules relevant to your question are under 27.3 and 27.4 of the MCC rules here. What I take from those is that: the wicketkeeper must remain behind the stumps until the ball strikes the striker or bat, passes the stumps, or the striker attempts to run. If this rule is broken, a no ball is called. in the time between a ball being bowled, and any ...


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