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13

A let in table tennis is any rally that does not end in a score. The "net service" that you described, where the ball on the service touches the net as it goes over, is one type of let. (All of the circumstances that result in a let are listed in the ITTF Handbook, section 2.09.) By definition, a let does not result in a point scored. Additionally, the ...


8

There's not going to be anything really governing 'serving hard' as ethical or not ethical. I played volleyball for 6 years, so I eventually had a pretty good serve as well. In PE class, or at parties (4th of July, etc.) that tend to have a volleyball net up, I would rather do Float Serves instead of just a power serve/ jump serve. It's less cocky looking, ...


8

See this page with Table Tennis rules. Specifically there are two rules to be read here. First, a legal serve is defined as: 2.06.03 As the ball is falling the server shall strike it so that it touches first his or her court and then, after passing over or around the net assembly, touches directly the receiver's court; in doubles, the ball shall touch ...


8

I do not have any official source but the way I remember it from watching tennis on TV: First service says what percent of the player's serves were successful. (He did not have to play the second service.) First serve percentage seems to be more apt description. First service won is the percentage of the points, where the player successfully made the first ...


7

Yes, the receiver needs to wait until the ball touches his playing area, otherwise it counts as being obstructed. You can read about it in table tennis rules 2.05.08 A player obstructs the ball if he or she, or anything he or she wears or carries, touches it in play when it is above or travelling towards the playing surface, not having touched his or her ...


7

In doubles you must serve diagonally, but in singles you can serve in any direction. The rules for service are in Section 2.06 of the ITTF Handbook: 2.06 THE SERVICE 2.06.01 Service shall start with the ball resting freely on the open palm of the server's stationary free hand. 2.06.02 The server shall then project the ball near ...


7

From the (June 2016) Laws of Badminton, Law 13: It shall be a "fault": [...] 13.3 if in play, the shuttle: [...] 13.3.4 touches the person or dress of a player And from Law 15: A shuttle is not in play when: [...] 15.2 it hits the surface of the court The shuttle is in play because it has not yet hit the surface of the ...


6

The reference to "continuously forward" motion indicates that the server is not allowed to take multiple "fake" swings before hitting the shuttle. Doing so might unbalance their opponent and give an unfair advantage to the server, making a game quite one-sided. So once the racket has been drawn back, it can only be swung forwards once, as it hits the ...


6

In organized table tennis "masking" your serve is illegal. Your hand must be held flat and open, palm to the ceiling, with the ball resting on it. Then keeping the open palm you must toss the ball up at least 6 inches into the air. The ball must come back down to the same level before you can hit it with the racket. Why is this? Well if I were allowed ...


6

Serve strategies are used to gain advantage over an opponent. A lob will hit the front wall high and central, and will take the ball over head to the back of the opponents half. If a player returns this type of serve easily then a change of serve tactic may be used. Eg, A smash or power serve. This is when the server serves the ball with a powerful ...


6

As of now there are very few standardized statistics taken by the ATP or WTA concerning "percentage of sets won by player who served first". However, Professors Franc Klaassen and Jan R. Magnus recently completed research on a number of Wimbledon tournaments and inspected several questions including the one concerning the outcomes of sets depending on who ...


6

Until the service has been struck, a part of both of your feet needs to stay on the same spot on the ground (law §9.1.4). Notably, this means that the rest of your body may be well outside the rectangle. For instance, top-level Mens Doubles players usually stand just after the front service line and have their racket extended forwards in order to attack the ...


5

If a player (or doubles team) wins the coin toss the somewhat-standard strategy is: If you feel like you have a superior return of serve and have a better chance at breaking your opponents serve than they do breaking yours, elect to receive serve first. I would imagine players like Nadal, Djokovic and Ferrer choose to receive if they win the coin toss. If ...


5

Advantages of the backhand serve on your forehand side getting quicker to the center of the court easier to watch the ball & opponent as you are facing it when moving to the center Cons could be accuracy, less power as compared to a forehand serve.


5

According to the rules, rule 5. Score in Game states: 5. SCORE IN A GAME ...The player/team whose turn it was to serve first in the tie-break game shall be the receiver in the first game of the following set.


5

Under rule 9 of the source at Killerspin.com: A rally is a let: ... 9.2 If the service is delivered when the receiving player or pair is not ready, provided that neither the receiver nor his partner attempts to strike the ball. This rule is self-explanatory: the rally is not scored. As no point has been awarded, service will not change, so the serving ...


5

Generally, men move faster on court and have a more powerful smash - this is plain visible in Mixed doubles, where the man often covers three fourth of the court, and in smash statistics, where men are up 30km/h or more. On the other hand, the defensive ability of top women is very close to that of the men. For these reasons, a high shot to the back to a ...


5

As the ITTF rules state : From the start of service until it is struck, the ball shall be above the level of the playing surface and behind the server's end line, and it shall not be hidden from the receiver by the server or his or her doubles partner or by anything they wear or carry. There's no mention of where your body has to be positioned during ...


4

There are serves called "high-toss" serves. You might want to research on that. But for me as a player, the best way to know a difficult service is to do the "trial-and-error" technique. Try to predict a service and predict a return, but most importantly try to stick in mind the body language of how the opponent does the serve and put it mind. In that way, ...


4

LAWS OF BADMINTON According to the official LAWS OF BADMINTON (2012), set by the Badminton World Federation, chapter 9 is applicable: SERVICE. In that chapter, no reference can be found of the fact that a specific time interval needs to be taken into account or that the shuttle needs to be fully released. The following is to mention about "taking your ...


4

Table tennis serving rules have changed over the years. Under the current ITTF rules, the player to serve first is chosen at random, with the winner of the random draw able to choose to serve first or receive first. Sometimes in casual games, the first serve is chosen by volley, where a "practice" rally is played to determine who serves first. The player ...


4

Your first scenario is legal (front wall first, then side wall, then opponent's half). The second is not (side wall, then front wall, then opponent's half). PDF of the rules is linked at the bottom. Rule 5 (The Serve) says the following about a legal serve (5.7): A serve is good if: 5.7.3 the ball is struck directly to the front wall, hitting it ...


4

In a Doubles match you must serve between the Short Service Line and the Doubles Long Service Line, and in a Singles match, you must serve between the Short Service Line and the Singles Long Service Line, also known as the Back Boundary Line. There is an exception however, for Para-badminton wheelchair Classes singles, the Doubles Long Service Line is used, ...


4

It's just a ritual. Some players hold the ball straight in front of them (like Marcus Böhme, Maxim Mikhailov), some bounce it, some even talk to themselves (like Christian Fromm from the German National team). It helps concentration. It helps you focus on your serve and it let's you take full advantage of the eight seconds available to perform your serve. ...


4

I couldn't find anything about this in the ITF/USTA Rules, and players very frequently have their body over the baseline. Take a look at this slo-mo video of Roger Federer serving. He (and most other pros) always lean slightly into their serve for the exact reason you specified. It's fair game as far as the rules are concerned.


4

The rules you linked to do address this case, albeit not directly. The rule you cited says (emphasis mine): 2.9.1 The rally shall be a let: 2.9.1.1 if in service the ball touches the net assembly, provided the service is otherwise correct or the ball is obstructed by the receiver or his or her partner. According to the ITTF rules, in a legal service (...


4

Yes, then you lose a point. According to ITTF's Rules (The International Table Tennis Federation's Handbook 2019 v2): 2.5 DEFINITIONS 2.5.1 A rally is the period during which the ball is in play. 2.5.2 The ball is in play from the last moment at which it is stationary on the palm of the free hand before being intentionally projected in service ...


3

All calls in volleyball eventually come from the head referee. However, he or she can ask their assistants for assistance if they didn't have a good view of the play. If the referee cannot make a decision based on their own view and those of the assistants, calling a replay is perfectly fine. It's similar to basketball. When the officials cannot decide the ...


3

As you probably know - one of the most important things about your serve in tennis is a consistent toss. One that produces the ball following the same height and trajectory each time. You can even just practice your toss by itself, without actually hitting the ball (you might have done this). The goal should be that the ball lands between a foot or two ...


3

The rule is that the player who wins the toss can either: Choose to serve or receive. Choose his initial end, which gives the opponent the choice of serving or receiving. Give the opponent the choice between (1) and (2). This is rarely done but I've seen it, and done it. JS Connors almost invariably chose to receive first, on the theory that he liked his ...


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