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13

The only way to learn a hockey stop is practicing often. Repetition is the only way for your muscles to improve its muscle memory. Learning proper form and technique will come with experience. You could try to break down the technique into little pieces. Start slow and then learn to turn to reduce your speed Gradually turn quicker and quicker You can ...


12

There are a few things to look for on your skate blades to indicate it's time for sharpening. First would be visible nicks appearing anywhere along the length of the blade. You also want to look out for 'rounded' edges. Lastly you will want to avoid pitting which is quite common if you leave your cloth skate guards on your skates between sessions. Be ...


11

Stopping is a crucial skill in skating. Inline skates generally come with a removable heel brake on the right skate. The advice on skating that you quoted from WikiHow does indeed refer to using the heel brake for stopping. Advanced inline skaters usually remove the brake. There are a couple of reasons for this. The brake can often get in the way of ...


9

I find it interesting you can slide/stop on quad roller skates. In fact, I think that might be the problem. If you tried a proper hockey stop in quad roller skates (lifting the angle of your foot to only engage the corners of the 2 inside wheels) I'd bet you'd fall. Which means you've learned to apply your weight in the exact wrong way... and worse, it's ...


9

The only limit is ability. I've seen skaters who can do dozens and dozens of double toe-loops in a row. I myself have easily done combinations of five or six jumps, and I'm not on championship level by far. But the harder to do the jump, the harder it is to chain it. The reason professional skaters don't do these combinations is because they won't get ...


7

Yes, the wiki is talking about the heel brake. The first thing I would advice is remove the heel brake(s). Learn to brake without. Reason being: It can get stuck behind things. If you plan to learn any other discipline like aggressive rollerblading, you really don't want to try dropping in a ramp with that heel break still on your skates. Learn to brake '...


7

Your skates are likely too sharp for your confidence level, or too deep of a hollow (probably both). Like said above ... 1/2 inch hollow I find to be too grippy to shave ice very well. For me a 3/4 inch grind is optimum for hockey skates. The rate at which you can stop depends on how steeply you point the skates to the oncoming ice. At 70 degrees from the ...


6

Don't forget cone work. A hockey stop is an exaggerated cut. Cone work helps build the fundamentals of cutting which then builds to a hockey stop.


6

As your question already suggests, there are many contributing elements: Wheels: diameter – although there is some controversy over the exact amount by which the diameter contributes, generally the rolling resistance depends on diameter in inverse proportion. In short, bigger wheels equals smaller resistance. Also, on a rough surface, bigger wheels ...


4

The real reason for using O°°O or OO°O is to allow you to perform rail tricks more easily, and without grinding away the wheels so much as it allows the rail to touch the skate, rather than the rubber wheels. OOO tends to give you a shorter wheelbase, which can allow you to spin and change direction more rapidly. ooooo is quite stable at speed, and may ...


4

I've seen this question a couple of times. The WFTDA rule is all about "skating in a jam" so skating between jams isn't covered. However, a lot of venues have different insurance policies that will apply for skating between jams. The head ref should be made aware of any policies and filter these through to other refs and captains. I think it would be ...


3

Find some grass. Obviously this isn't all that useful in a skate park or on a hockey rink, but if you are primarily street/sidewalk skating, one of the safest options is to find a surface that will slow you down not give you road rash if you have to bail. When skating fast on sidewalks, you need to account for pedestrians, pets, obstacles and the issues ...


3

No one has mentioned the "C-cut" style of backwards skating (video), which leaves tracks something like this: || | \ | / || / | \ | || I believe this style has greater potential for efficient backwards skating, because it eliminates side-to-side motion. It also takes advantage of weight shifts from leg to leg, giving each leg time to ...


3

You ideally want to be pushing your feet from an imaginary line down the centre of your body, outwards. This is pretty much the opposite of skating forwards. The reason these people skate slalom style backwards without lifting skates up is because that way you are getting the power from both of your legs at the same time, not one and then the other. If ...


3

I'm 225 with a deep cut on my blades, and I can full speed stop on both legs no problem. Its all about weight transition and managing how much weight you put down on that stopping leg. Also you need to be mindful of your momentum, by that I mean you have to get the skates parallel to your direction of travel with little weight as possible, then you ...


3

It's not surprising at all, and actually completely normal, that you had trouble with your transition from one skate to another. Here's why: Figure skates and hockey skates are completely different styles of skates. Figure skate boots can have a higher heel which would put your foot at more of an incline than a hockey skate. Figure skate blades tend to ...


3

The answer itself is this: on the ice you create rotation the same way you do on normal ground - by spinning yourself (by creating angular momentum). Ever heard of "an object in motion stays in motion?" That applies to angular momentum (rotation), too. It means that once you've created rotation you'll keep spinning - until you create rotation in the ...


3

Generically speaking (rather than you specifically), socks are optional. Barefoot skating is a pretty common question in skating specific forums like http://www.fsuniverse.net/ or http://skatingforums.com or http://www.skatelogforum.com. Skaters say they can feel the surface better and the grip is better especially with custom fitted boots. There is the ...


2

I think you should check the blade sharpening. If the groove of the blade is too deep, they will feel really sharp and it could be hard to practise stops. Try lowering the groove as much as possible. After you learn how to stop go with deeper groove if the blades feels too dull. You could also try grinding blades against wood to take off the sharpest edge. ...


2

I'd recommend the following steps, which if you've ever skied before should sound familiar. This might sound stupid but stick with me here... 1) Skate forward at a slow-medium speed, then to slow yourself put your feet in the "pizza" configuration. http://www.southparkstudios.com/clips/153300/thumper-the-super-cool-ski-instructor 2) After you are ...


2

The toe loop, according to what I have learnt, should be 1/2 in the air. It doesn't really matter how much rotation is done on the ice as long as it is somewhere between 1/4 and 1/2. A single Salchow consists of one full revolution. However it does feel like jumping 1/2 revolution, since the technique is quite similar to that of the waltz jump. 1/4 ...


2

A hockey stop is basically letting the blade of your skate slide across the ice. It doesn't require much force or direction, just the movement of your upper body and leg to angle the skate slightly. A power slide is used to make a quick or sharp turn. You slide your lead skate around and drag your other across the ice, sliding it. Obviously one is a stop, ...


2

Oh boy. Tough to describe. This move actually is entirely on the outside edge of your skate. Your power is going to come from cutting/steering the outside (external) edge around in a tight 'C'. Although it looks like he is starting on his inside edge, he is just barely on the outside edge. Don't over think it!


2

Indeed skaters focus on one at a time. And there notable differences between single skating and pair skating that require a lot of time to practice. Often skaters switch from one discipline to another. Usually singles switch to either pair skating (if they cannot nail all triples for instance and in pairs they can focus on one or two) or dance (if they ...


2

In my opinion, the quotation refers to jump rotation fast enough to perform the jumps expected in senior-level competition. There are two parts to creating the rotation for triple and quadruple jumps. The first part is creating a torque with the edges of the blade (as mentioned by the other answers) and toe picks. The second part is manipulation of the ...


2

Basics moves I. Forwards Parallel (Fish): legs side-by-side and adjust turning by knees -- the II. Forwards Monoline (Snake): both legs in the same line Forwards Criss-Cross: other leg curls smoothly behind the other leg Alternating Forwards Cross Double Cross Forwards One Foot An incomplete slalom moves list can be found in Wikipedia. Breaking for ...


2

First of all, you need to set up "rockering". It's when outside wheels are less then inside. This will increase your maneuverability. Like (76mm 80mm 80mm 76mm). You will need time to get used to. Improve your balance. Only then practice with basic elements such as "monoline", "criss-cross", "one foot".


2

Check your wheels for flat spots. Flat spots make your wheels wobble in turns. Check if any bearings are broken or close to be worn out. Check if the screws of your wheels need replacement or aren't fully screwed in. Check if your wheels have spacers or need replacement. Check if the frame is in a bad condition or is at least properly attached.


1

I read the question as referring to the hockey mohawk turn, where you do have both skates on the ice at once. That link contains a video, and the basic drill of picking up one foot at a time while stationary in the mohawk position, which actually is a great warmup. See also this answer about increasing your flexibility for a wide plie in ballet.


1

Short answer: You don't need stretching to learn skating. You don't need 180 degrees for a mohawk! That will not be a good mohawk and defies the reason for learning to do one. Figure skating doesn't work in straight lines, and that is the very thing beginning skaters have trouble learning and understanding. First off all, mohawks are easiest when done on ...


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