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9

There's a link at the bottom of this post to an online version of the rules of Snooker. These are the rules I'm working off of to answer your questions. If you're watching this, I'm guessing you understand the rules of snooker, but I'll explain some of the basics in detail for others reading this. Most terms in quotes can be found in the rules link. At 1:40 ...


7

Given these requirements, the minimum winning score is 22 points. Firstly, under these conditions, the lowest total score is 42 points (all reds sunk with no colour, plus all colours in sequence to end the frame). Secondly, if a player scored exactly half of these points, the opponent scores the other half, and would tie the frame by definition. If they ...


5

Not in snooker, on any shot. You just have to hit the correct ball first. The break shot has no extra rules. The official rules of snooker are here, the World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association No specific rule applies to the opening shot of a frame, nor is there anything requiring cushions to be hit. There is a rule about cushions in the ...


5

In most situations, not attempting to hit the ball "on" would be a "Foul and a Miss" and the opponent would have the option of having the balls reset to the position before the shot, rendering this tactic worthless: The striker shall, to the best of his ability, endeavour to hit the ball on or a ball that could be on after a Red has been potted. If the ...


5

The referee does the replacement in the same way every official has ever made a decision before TV replays regardless of the sport. They use their memory and their knowledge and the game-specific techniques they are trained in. The snooker referee is only required to replace "the ones that matter". Obviously the cue ball counts, and any object balls that ...


5

Building consistency in snooker (and actually doing anything) is all about progressively adding complexity to the shots you practice. A straight blue off the spot into the centre pocket is easy, right? So practice it until it becomes second nature. Once it is, progress to a thick 3/4 ball. Then 1/2 ball. Then 1/4 ball. Practice each step until you can make ...


4

I've been through exactly that experience. I expected to find it weird, but did not - proportionally, it's almost the same. In fact, what does feel strange is playing with a 9mm snooker cue, hitting US pool sized balls. It's easier (for me, anyway) to put unwanted side on the ball with a small tip. Dr Dave Alciatore's page on cue tips gives more information ...


4

I think it's a lot like golf as well, and I think I can generalize a bit on this. Sports that have competitors who typically show restraint and reserve typically are those which also expect silence from spectators. These sports are usually sports where a player isn't directly contesting the actions of an opponent; rather, opponents are both trying to do ...


4

Every red down is a possible eight points, giving a total of 120 if all reds can be coupled with a black. Yet the actual number of reds coupled with blacks is very small, and it's considered an impressive feat to score 100 points in a frame including the final run of colours, let alone 120 points including the final run, let alone from just sinking red and ...


3

According to the Wikipedia article about him, James Cahill received a wildcard from the organization: At the 2019 World Championship, Cahill gained a place in qualifying having been given a wildcard place by the World Professional Billiards and Snooker Association, despite being an amateur. As for the rest of the participants: The top 16 players in ...


3

Yes, because colour-blind players can easily mistake the brown for a red. Usually when the brown goes down table amongst the reds. Peter Ebdon and Mark Williams have hit the brown by mistake on TV. You're not allowed to ask the ref where the brown is, or what colour a ball is. You can only ask "Is that the brown?". If anyone knows the rationale for such ...


3

If you go by http://www.epa.org.uk/wrules.php I think that your shot was a foul according to rule 1 b in section G on Legal Shots. On all shots, the player must: a. Cause the Cue Ball's initial contact with a ball to be with a ball "On", AND THEN b. Pot a ball "On" OR; Cause the Cue Ball or any Object Ball to contact a cushion. ...


3

No, he will not be a in the "Top 16 list", however if he decides to take place in any tournament on the World Snooker Tour he would not need to play a qualifikation. In 2005 Shaun Murphy won the World Championship and he qualified automatically for every tournament in the next season as the number two seed (and number one seed for the 2006 World ...


3

Neither, it is mounted just like it is shown in the diagram. The 0.75" side is mounted to a flat rail and the long side is extends in line with the top of the rail. Like so: You can see an example of this in the following video series: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IEmCmWUNxnw


3

According to Wikipedia, citing this BBC article: In October 2004, during qualifying for the UK Championship, Jamie Burnett became the only player to record a break of more than 147 in tournament play, when he scored 148 against Leo Fernandez. He took the brown as the free ball, then potted the brown again followed by the 15 reds with 12 blacks, two pinks ...


2

The build-up Drago was down 41-65 with only blue, pink and black on the table. So he needed 6 points from snookers to be able to tie. He forced a snooker on the blue, moving back to 46-65, but still needing a snooker. Drago's next shot was a great safety behind the pink, and McManus was unable to make the shot, with a kiss on the pink leaving Drago only 52-...


2

You're asking about the topic 'cue ball deflection' or 'squirt'. Pool players talk about this a lot, snooker players not so much. Google those terms and you will find many explanations - Dr Dave Alciatore's site is an excellent resource.


2

The general principle is that striking perfectly through the centre will send the ball straight. Any spin that it develops will be exactly that of the natural rolling of the ball across the felt when it eventually gains grip. If the ball is struck off centre, the ball will have spin that is in the direction from the centre through the actual point of ...


2

I'm sure it has, but it doesn't really mean anything. It's not a meaningful achievement and wouldn't have been noted. A "147" is a break of 147, as a "century" is scoring 100 points in one turn - anyone could score 100 points in multiple turns.


2

From Wikipedia: Snooker cue weights vary between 16 and 18 oz. While a lighter cue is usually for beginners to develop correct technique when starting out, some professional snooker players use lighter cues (15 - 16 1/2 oz.) Based on this information, weight of the cue stick is very preferential, but it would be safe to consider the average weight of ...


2

I believe not, I have watched snooker since the early 1980's and believe it's a very old part of the game. This is supported by wikipedia on snooker given that the inventor lived in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.


2

The definiton of break in the WPBSA rules is odd and has no meaning in practice. The World Snooker Tour definitely counts consecutive points rather than the number of pots. The following image is from the China Open 2018: The Oxford Dictionary and Wikipedia define break correctly. Oxford Dictionary: Billiards Snooker A consecutive series of successful ...


2

The premise of the question is fundamentally wrong. Playing the ball to a difficult position and leaving the racked reds as intact as possible is a common early-game tactic. Only when the reds are freed up do the players begin earnestly seeking points, but this is the only point where such nursing would become possible. The tactic works because the players ...


2

Section 4 of the Official Rules allows the referee a lot of discretion in this kind of matter: In the event of [...] any conduct by a Player which in the opinion of the referee is wilfully or persistently unfair [...] the referee shall either: (v) warn the Player that in the event of any such further conduct the frame will be awarded to his opponent; or (vi)...


2

There's a few differences between a snooker cue and a pool one: Weight: Because pool balls are heavier than their snooker cousins pool cues tend to be heavier to match. The weight distribution is also different - pool cues are heavier on the grip where snooker cues have more weight at the tip. Tip size: Snooker cues have a narrower tip (~9-10mm vs 12-13mm) ...


2

Depends on the position of the cue ball If the cue ball is obstructed by a colour from hitting both sides of a red ball - ie it gets tucked up behind the yellow - then yes, it is a free ball as you would expect. However, if the cue ball ends up, say, over a baulk corner pocket, then no, this would not be a free ball. This is because the player is not deemed ...


2

It's not specifically against the rules as far as I know, although if the referee were to believe a player was being deliberately "unsporting" then they can issue a warning and if there is any further such conduct they can award the frame to the opponent. Additionally however the rules do have measures in place to safeguard against this (and other ...


1

I had a look at the sessions from the 17 days of the Snooker World Championship in 2020 to see if the theory that the higher seeded player is seated by the yellow pocket side. This seems to be the case and the highest seeded players score will also be shown on the left side on the screen as well. In a two table setup the highest ranking player will still sit ...


1

Player B gets a free ball, because he is snookered after a foul.


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