5

Always start choosing your equipment with the boots. Because you're quite tall(6'2" ~ 188cm), I assume you have big feet as well. Find boots that fit your feet good. Most boots will also take a form of your foot and get a bit bigger, so if the boot is a little bit tight(not more than a little bit!), it should be alright. After trying the boots, make sure ...


5

First of all, I should mention that snowboarding isn't my strongest dicipline. Instead, I'm a skier - and sometimes even a telemark skier - but the general idea is the same. To begin with, going fast shouldn't be a goal per se. Rather, your goal should be to go fast AND in control. The only way to do this, and the only way to feel comfortable doing it, is ...


5

Since you've stated that you are at an intermediate level of riding, I would imagine that you have a style of riding that you prefer. Once you have decided what kind of riding you're going to do, remember that it's not just important to decide on what type of board you'll be riding, but the combination of boots and bindings as well. Note: Different riders ...


5

I've been riding for 5-6 years now and skating for longer, and I tried the same thing about 2 years into it. I found that the switch took a while to get used to, but once I had the muscle memory I could switch flawlessly. What I did, as silly as it sounds, was look in a mirror while standing on my board and looked at my stance. I analyzed the key points in ...


4

It turns out that the Small Final would matter in the rare situation that 4 or more competitors in the Big Final are disqualified. If that happened, then they would award the remaining medal(s) to the top finisher(s) of the Small Final. This situation happened yesterday in the Women's Short Track Speed Skating 3000M Relay. Four teams participated in the ...


3

Ride, ride, ride and ride some more, there's really no secret that will diminish your fears. Your fears are natural and everyone who picks up the sport will go through it in varying degrees based on their willingness to fall and get up. I've fallen countless times and still fall and can't see anyway to improve without doing so. I will say one thing tho, I ...


3

If you want to avoid injury, take it slow. I would suggest traversing the transitions as the second link suggests. Start at the bottom of the transition on one side and practice cutting back to the transition on the other side. With each run, you will feel more confident. You should be able to climb higher into the transitions with each run, until you ...


3

Hemp, Bamboo and Cotton are often used for their absorbancy rather than wicking characteristics. Hemp and Bamboo have become popular in some applications due to their anti=-bacterial properties and they remain more 'comfortable' than cotton when damp, but they will still absorb moisture. I recommend Merino wool socks, and my personal preference is, as ...


3

You have already answered your own question. Anything that keeps you dry will keep you warm. There are other fibers you can try like Bamboo or synthetics if you don't like wool. I am unsure if I've ever seen a hemp sock, sounds a little scratchy to me. Cotton is just the worst because it gets so soggy. I prefer the thinnest material possible in general ...


3

A general tip here would be: follow some freestyle/jumping classes with a good teacher. There can be different reasons for that and a good teacher will be able to see it and guide you. However, there are a few basic things you should think about(I learned those while snowboarding, so I'm not 100% sure if that would apply to skiing too). Approaching the ...


2

As a general bit of advice, go to youtube and do a search for learning how to jump on a snowboard and you will find a wealth of information. Some really good videos with great advice and knowledge. As an opinion from someone who snowboards every chance he can :) first do as ipso referenced and do not try jumps so much as get comfortable gliding off an edge/...


2

The first level of the pagoda: The primary key to jumping is balance. You should start off by exactly NOT putting more weight on your back foot. You should find (or make) a kicker that you can glide off of, and that has an appropriate landing transition [angle], whereby your balance is centered from beginning to end. Groove on the same jump until you ...


2

I've been in the same position as you and hope I can shed some light on the subject: I found that it wasn't super difficult to transfer over, but the major thing was the idea of bindings and boots. This is a major difference, as now your feet are attached to the board which will change you balance and how comfortable you are on a board. The technique is ...


2

You should go with the 162 size if you feel that you are done growing and won't need a bigger snowboard anytime soon. That way you won't have to buy a new bag if you outgrow your snowboard.


2

Everyone will have his/her own opinion on the matter. One way might work well for one person and another way will work better for another. The important thing is to stay safe and know your limits. I've been snowboarding for six years and this is what I found to work well for me: It was my third season and one of the lift operators suggested that I try out ...


2

Being a self-taught snowboarder (16+ years and counting) my short response is practice, practice, practice. I realize that is difficult as you do not have access to the slopes on a regular basis. So with that said, here are some opinions on your concerns. As Qvist said, and you confirmed, going fast is not the goal. The feeling you get when you point ...


2

I would consider putting the bar behind your back leg, essentially under your butt cheek. Here is a short video: ehow.com Riding a T-Bar on a Snowboard


2

Snowboard boots should fit tight around your entire foot, ankle, and calf. Ideally you should feel about the same pressure against all parts of the inside of the boot with laces tight. The only exception to this is around your toes which should have relief both in the long direction and upward. You need to be able to move your toes freely otherwise they'...


2

In addition to the method described above, you can test your preferred stance by running and sliding across a sheet of ice or a polished floor. If you find that you're still unsure of your preferred stance, keep it mind that its not unheard of for people to ride both ways pretty evenly. You don't necessarily have to adjust your binding to favor one stance ...


2

There is a way in which you can test but it works better on a skateboard (as you aren't strapped onto the board). Place the board on a field or grassy area where it isn't going to move much. Run towards it at a relaxed pace and jump onto it. this will put your lead leg forward by instinct its similar to the example you gave but it gives you the experience of ...


2

I've had boa lacing for a few years now and although I have not read any 'official' recommendations, my answer would be... it depends. When just back from a trip I tend to leave them open to let the inside of the boots dry up. When dry though, I tend to close the inner liner, and tighten the boots up to at least as tight as they would be when my foot is in ...


2

I experienced the same problem, I would just take my scarf, wrap it once around it, so when I sit on it I won't lose it but I could take it away easily, and then use the rest as u cushion. It's not the best solution, but it was the easiest for me and it took away alot of the pressure on my leg


1

I always found that having my bindings set slightly back on the board (leaving you with more tip length than tail length) makes a big difference in deeper powder. It gives you a little more confidence in being able to keep your nose out of the powder and "hydroplane" ("snowplane" ?) on the surface. I always rode the Burton EST bindings on the rail system ...


1

I tend to hook it behind my front leg, but I do rest against the upright/cable with my arm/hand. This gives you more freedom to move the point of pressure, especially on a long/steep climb, and as I have damage to my spine from an old injury I need some way to do this, but it does preclude eating/drinking. As I don't eat or drink while on the board this ...


1

I'm 6'4", 250. Get a wide board, that's a few inches longer than you normally would. The wide board is most important (size 14's have this tendency to hang over the edges a little, imagine that). I just don't like having to turn my bindings way far out to feel confident that things aren't going to get sketchy for me no a toe-side turn (or heel-side for ...


1

Work your way into tight areas. Go find some trees with a good bit of space between them, where you can start getting used to the flow of picking a side and how hard to cut into each one. Gradually move into areas where the trees are tighter together. If things get hairy, don't try and come to a stand-still, you'll wind up hitting something anyway while ...


1

There is an old debate I've seen on snowboarding forums about whether it's best to tense your muscles or relax your muscles in a fall. I've concluded that tense muscles tend to protect bones and resist twisted joints, but it would be interesting to hear what more experienced riders say. (this will be my ninth season)


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