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17

From what I understand, there are 2 benefits to toe strap bindings: It helps you push the heel of your foot further back into the bindings There's less added pressure on the top of your toe, so more comfort. I have Burton Citizen bindings and my sister has a Burton Stilleto. I can tell you point 2 is definitely true. Our indoor snow area use T-Bars and ...


11

If you feel that you are falling I believe the best you can do is to tuck to avoid injuring your wrists/elbows and avoid hitting the slope with your head. In certain situations falling can be avoided, but I don't know any techniques for that - it comes naturally with your experience, I believe. After the fall I do try to turn to my back - but I don't lift ...


8

3 things I've found for tight areas: Wear a helmet, I've bounced off of trees and it HURTS. Move both of your bindings back at the start of the day to help you keep your weight over the back, preventing the tip from digging in and sending you into a cartwheel. Don't push too hard into the outer branches of the trees, the branches catch all the snow meaning ...


8

This article lists several criteria to consider when choosing a first snowboard: Price of the board - get a cheap board or a higher quality board? Buying new or used could also be a factor Men or women's board - generally a criteria for women, since men/boys will usually get a board designed for men The type of snowboarding the rider will be participating ...


7

One thing I would mention is to try to minimize the risk to your environment and yourself. Use whatever control you have to avoid colliding with other people as well as trees, rocks, etc. Try and warn someone if it looks like you may collide. Usually this won't leave enough time to actually react but it may work. I also try to slow myself as much as ...


5

Always start choosing your equipment with the boots. Because you're quite tall(6'2" ~ 188cm), I assume you have big feet as well. Find boots that fit your feet good. Most boots will also take a form of your foot and get a bit bigger, so if the boot is a little bit tight(not more than a little bit!), it should be alright. After trying the boots, make sure ...


5

First of all, I should mention that snowboarding isn't my strongest dicipline. Instead, I'm a skier - and sometimes even a telemark skier - but the general idea is the same. To begin with, going fast shouldn't be a goal per se. Rather, your goal should be to go fast AND in control. The only way to do this, and the only way to feel comfortable doing it, is ...


5

I've been riding for 5-6 years now and skating for longer, and I tried the same thing about 2 years into it. I found that the switch took a while to get used to, but once I had the muscle memory I could switch flawlessly. What I did, as silly as it sounds, was look in a mirror while standing on my board and looked at my stance. I analyzed the key points in ...


5

Reasons that toe straps that cover your toe are better than Over the top straps: A lot more responsive! Extremely comfortable (especially for those with long toes). They take all the pressure off your toes, allowing for good blood circulation which keeps your feet warmer. Holds your boots tighter. From all the parts of my snowboard setup I have upgraded ...


5

Since you've stated that you are at an intermediate level of riding, I would imagine that you have a style of riding that you prefer. Once you have decided what kind of riding you're going to do, remember that it's not just important to decide on what type of board you'll be riding, but the combination of boots and bindings as well. Note: Different riders ...


5

I've been snowboarding for 5 years now but it was only this year I actually purchased my own board and binding. I chose the K2 Raygun and I would absolutely recommend it. It's not a beginner's board, and it's a great board for those who are intermediate and above. I consider myself an expert, and the guy at the shop said the Raygun is probably one of the ...


4

Start your turns early, which will result in wider turns. Use minimal edge; keep board as flat as possible while maintaining control. Look where you're going (ideally, a couple turns ahead), rather than at the trees.


4

After some reading, I found some information that I hope you find useful. Your board seems to be more of a park board rather than a speed/powder board. This is mostly due to your board having a decambered nose versus having a traditional nose. As you can see by the pictures below, a decambered nose doesn't have much of a lip compared to what a traditional ...


4

It turns out that the Small Final would matter in the rare situation that 4 or more competitors in the Big Final are disqualified. If that happened, then they would award the remaining medal(s) to the top finisher(s) of the Small Final. This situation happened yesterday in the Women's Short Track Speed Skating 3000M Relay. Four teams participated in the ...


3

A general tip here would be: follow some freestyle/jumping classes with a good teacher. There can be different reasons for that and a good teacher will be able to see it and guide you. However, there are a few basic things you should think about(I learned those while snowboarding, so I'm not 100% sure if that would apply to skiing too). Approaching the ...


3

Hemp, Bamboo and Cotton are often used for their absorbancy rather than wicking characteristics. Hemp and Bamboo have become popular in some applications due to their anti=-bacterial properties and they remain more 'comfortable' than cotton when damp, but they will still absorb moisture. I recommend Merino wool socks, and my personal preference is, as ...


3

You have already answered your own question. Anything that keeps you dry will keep you warm. There are other fibers you can try like Bamboo or synthetics if you don't like wool. I am unsure if I've ever seen a hemp sock, sounds a little scratchy to me. Cotton is just the worst because it gets so soggy. I prefer the thinnest material possible in general ...


3

Ride, ride, ride and ride some more, there's really no secret that will diminish your fears. Your fears are natural and everyone who picks up the sport will go through it in varying degrees based on their willingness to fall and get up. I've fallen countless times and still fall and can't see anyway to improve without doing so. I will say one thing tho, I ...


3

If you want to avoid injury, take it slow. I would suggest traversing the transitions as the second link suggests. Start at the bottom of the transition on one side and practice cutting back to the transition on the other side. With each run, you will feel more confident. You should be able to climb higher into the transitions with each run, until you ...


2

For a first time buyer, I would actually advise you to spend more time worrying about your boots than the board. Comfortable boots will improve your experience much more than the board will at your skill level. Until you are more advanced and know what kind of terrain/style of board you really want, look for a simple All-Mountain board that is in your ...


2

Everyone will have his/her own opinion on the matter. One way might work well for one person and another way will work better for another. The important thing is to stay safe and know your limits. I've been snowboarding for six years and this is what I found to work well for me: It was my third season and one of the lift operators suggested that I try out ...


2

Being a self-taught snowboarder (16+ years and counting) my short response is practice, practice, practice. I realize that is difficult as you do not have access to the slopes on a regular basis. So with that said, here are some opinions on your concerns. As Qvist said, and you confirmed, going fast is not the goal. The feeling you get when you point ...


2

You should go with the 162 size if you feel that you are done growing and won't need a bigger snowboard anytime soon. That way you won't have to buy a new bag if you outgrow your snowboard.


2

I've been in the same position as you and hope I can shed some light on the subject: I found that it wasn't super difficult to transfer over, but the major thing was the idea of bindings and boots. This is a major difference, as now your feet are attached to the board which will change you balance and how comfortable you are on a board. The technique is ...


2

As a general bit of advice, go to youtube and do a search for learning how to jump on a snowboard and you will find a wealth of information. Some really good videos with great advice and knowledge. As an opinion from someone who snowboards every chance he can :) first do as ipso referenced and do not try jumps so much as get comfortable gliding off an edge/...


2

The first level of the pagoda: The primary key to jumping is balance. You should start off by exactly NOT putting more weight on your back foot. You should find (or make) a kicker that you can glide off of, and that has an appropriate landing transition [angle], whereby your balance is centered from beginning to end. Groove on the same jump until you ...


2

I would consider putting the bar behind your back leg, essentially under your butt cheek. Here is a short video: ehow.com Riding a T-Bar on a Snowboard


2

I experienced the same problem, I would just take my scarf, wrap it once around it, so when I sit on it I won't lose it but I could take it away easily, and then use the rest as u cushion. It's not the best solution, but it was the easiest for me and it took away alot of the pressure on my leg


2

I've had boa lacing for a few years now and although I have not read any 'official' recommendations, my answer would be... it depends. When just back from a trip I tend to leave them open to let the inside of the boots dry up. When dry though, I tend to close the inner liner, and tighten the boots up to at least as tight as they would be when my foot is in ...


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