18

My question is: is it okay to be overly passionate/borderline aggressive when on the pitch playing a team sport without it carrying over to off the pitch interactions? Nope Simple answer: Unless everybody on the team thinks that's okay (or they are paid to accept it), that's simply not okay. Being on the pitch reveals the worst of a person's character. In ...


10

I can give some advice as to what I did to improve my free throws and how that may help in your quest for 100 consecutive. Just to give you a measure, I left high school shooting 27% from the free throw line. Yes, you read correctly, 27%. I'm 6'5" and played center while in high school. After being recruited, my future college coach told me that if I ...


9

Competitive sports will be like this. Learning to deal with cheap shots will just be another skill to pick up. Opponents pull cheap shots for two reasons: to create actual game play advantage and rattle you. In the sports I've played cheap shots meant to rattle the opposing player are often legal even if they are cheap. Referees are not there to make ...


9

If you play just for fun without any results being recorded you'll often have a few guys who don't give their best, simply because they don't have or want to. After all it's just for fun and having fun on the pitch can be very different from one person to another. Some people (like you) want to win every single game and someone else might be more interested ...


8

Answering your particular case: Your football skills (especially game vision, defensive skills) should match your leadership ambitions. Apart from the seniority in the team or leadership qualities, these are the skills players need to have to captain their teams. If you are in possession of these skills and if you create chances for your teammates to play (...


7

You have a good text book answer that you already accepted. I will simply give you my take as a big - 6'3" 200lb point guard - that takes a ton of abuse especially when playing in lower income areas - top city leagues. You are going to get pulled, scratched, elbowed, pushed, whatever. By just "taking" these actions you are allowing the referee to just ...


6

There's a reason that Sports Psychology has grown into a pretty large niche of psychology overall. :) Mastering one's mind will (in my opinion) always be a constant pursuit of mankind in general, and absolutely in sports. Whether it's hitting 100 free throws in a row in basketball, driving the ball down the fairway every time in golf, or kicking the last-...


6

If Something works You're playing to win (see akadian's answer for the issues here), and You're not interested in moving up to a higher standard of play then by all means keep doing it. However, if you are interested in moving up to a higher standard of play, you'll probably find players and/or teams who are adept at shutting down a one-dimensional player,...


5

“Hitting the wall”, or "pinging" is colloquial for having your heart rate bouncing off your Max Heart Rate (MHR). Being overly out of breath and head-dizzy are symptoms. “Bonking” is colloquial for when your muscles run out of glucose-etc. Your entire body aching – especially your shoulders – is a symptom. These are two very distinct feelings; but are ...


5

Have you considered how you may put pressure on your son playing competitive? This is just a question you should ask yourself in how your son perceives the game and your reactions to it. Everyone, and especially children are different this way. In general here in The Netherlands the competitive style of soccer (football) games is played down right now. Sure, ...


4

I used to have the same problem doing another sport, swimming. I used to have competitions and trainings in the morning all the time, and for sports, it is not unusual. The best routine to get yourself used to, as far as I'm concerned and what I learned through my 12 years of swimming: Obviously, try to sleep early. You need to get at least 8 hours of ...


4

I've been through this kind of issue with other sports, and the best solution I know of is to make it clear why you're playing the game. That may sound obvious, but once you get round to asking people, you discover that they actually have significantly different motivations: Some players are there because they want to play the game at the highest level they ...


4

Are you playing in a league where the goal is to win every game or pick-up games where you play for fun? In a league, if you have a shot that has 100% accuracy and your opponent has no way to prevent you from shooting, then you owe it to your team to abuse the setup. There's 4 things that can happen. Your opponents complain, the league bans the setup/shot, ...


3

Instilling motivation, at any age, is typically a problem most coaches face. It’s a tough challenge to balance fun against hard work regardless of the age group. That’s why direction from the coach is so important. Especially when you consider the time constraints that many adults face. I’m a member of a rowing club. Our coach meets with each individual ...


3

A general tip here would be: follow some freestyle/jumping classes with a good teacher. There can be different reasons for that and a good teacher will be able to see it and guide you. However, there are a few basic things you should think about(I learned those while snowboarding, so I'm not 100% sure if that would apply to skiing too). Approaching the ...


3

If they are at the same level as you, but more aggressive, they will usually make more errors, so if you hang in there, and keep getting the ball back, they will tend to make mistakes. If they are really aggressive, they like to come to the net, so keep them back by hitting deep shots as much as possible, don't give them short balls.


3

I'm afraid the answer is that it depends. If there were a specific answer, don't you think everyone would try to emulate it? ;) I suggest looking at examples of what current athletes do to maintain focus. Here's one example about Dirk Nowitzki, currently a career 87.7 percent free throw shooter. Also, it's worth pointing out that in basketball, no one has ...


3

According to what I get on the golf course, the pre-shot routine prepare your body for the upcoming sequence of movements. Golf teachers usually teach you to get the feeling for the next shoot until you fell comfortable, and this become a routine in every shoot. Usually when you are about to shoot, your mind can play a lot of tricks on you (and more tricks ...


3

I'd say you need to distract yourself from the bigger picture. Don't worry about the score or your performance or whether you're "better" than your opponent. Instead focus on Playing each point in isolation Making near-perfect movements Knowing where your opponent is moving on the court If you can concentrate on those things, the rest of the game will ...


3

Playing at 100% effort all the time is not something anyone does, ever. Watch soccer (non-US: football) players. Are they going at 100%? Only if they have a scoring chance, or are defending a scoring chance, for the most part. Playing at full speed in soccer means you're basically sprinting, and who can sprint for 90 minutes (or even 45)? Mental effort, ...


3

It is an interesting question and I think that it probably relates to the way your mind works(since you mentioned that it applies to things outside of tennis/sport as well). But keep in mind that effort can be measured in absolute terms as well as relative terms, so giving 100% of what you know is possible versus what you think is possible will actually ...


2

You should have a look at some professional sports psychologist. In particular Greg Dale from Duke University is particularly good. There is no shortage of research done on this topic. A couple of the most powerful tools are: Visualization: if you want to stay cool in a match imagine yourself doing so before the game. There is a story that Michael Jordan ...


2

I think this really depends on your ambitions. What is the purpose of you playing the game. I mean, really think about WHY you are playing. I don't know why you are playing, but for most players (i think?) it's about doing something that makes you feel good. It's probably a mix of getting exercise, playing a game (games are fun), having fun with friends or ...


2

I list some basic strategies below, you can mix them to your needs. General Let him/her run out of energy? Continue deep baseline shots without risks (not letting him/her to net)? Hard to come to net unless a mistake or a change in tempo (hit a slow shot to get some extra time to come to net)? Surprise: do not make your intentions apparent, fool the other ...


2

1) It's not that cheap. Pulling jersey, being grabby, etc. are all "in-between" type of plays. It's physical play that isn't necessarily a foul. Remember, basketball IS a physical sport. Not every time players come in physical contact with each other it's a foul. 2) Suck it up, no excuses. The fact that it's frustrating you means you aren't being ...


2

I don't think you'll find any explicit historical events or conditions that led to the absence of ties (mostly) in U.S. sports. I think it's just a product of the sports fans' sentiments that frown upon ties and draws. For most sports, it's not incredibly difficult to "untie" the game either. Since baseball is one of the most influential games in American ...


2

I've heard the player was checking the speed of the pitch which is usually displayed on the scoreboard after every pitch.


1

There are all kinds of players out there. Some are completely quiet, not even calling out scores once in a while, and on the other end of the spectrum some comment and joke around without pause. There is one kind that annoys me very much - the swearing ones who seem to have no fun at all. What you are describing is very common, in my experience, and you ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible