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9

According to "What do adult squash players think about protective eyewear?" (by C. Finch, P. Vear): The major reason for not wearing protective eyewear was the perception that it was unnecessary. Poor vision and a lack of comfort were also stated as reasons by a significant number of players. BBC article "Squash players fail to protect eyes" states ...


6

Serve strategies are used to gain advantage over an opponent. A lob will hit the front wall high and central, and will take the ball over head to the back of the opponents half. If a player returns this type of serve easily then a change of serve tactic may be used. Eg, A smash or power serve. This is when the server serves the ball with a powerful ...


6

I've heard reports of amateur players who are ambidextrous swapping a tennis racket from one hand to the other to have two forehands. I don't know about squash and tennis, but in badminton there's no rule banning moving the racket between your left and right hands. The reason is probably because, except perhaps at beginner level, there's no advantage to ...


5

According to the rules on World Squash site A return is good if the ball: 6.2.1 is struck correctly before it has bounced twice on the floor; and 6.2.2 without hitting either player, or their clothing or racket, hits the front wall, either directly or after hitting any other wall(s), above the tin and below the out-line, without having first ...


5

As far as I know, there are no specific drills that will help you improve the "lens-shots" (I think they're called that in English). It'll come naturally as you spend more and more hours on the court. However, some exercises can help you more than others. (1) Boast-straights One player plays in front of the T, and the other one behind it. Of course, both ...


5

From http://www.squashtalk.com*: Sex: 84% male. 16% female. Age Under-15, 2%; 16–24, 21%; 25–34, 25%; 35–44, 26%, 45–54, 18%; 55–64, 6%; 65+, 2%. *Please note that the data is from 2007


5

Advantages of the backhand serve on your forehand side getting quicker to the center of the court easier to watch the ball & opponent as you are facing it when moving to the center Cons could be accuracy, less power as compared to a forehand serve.


4

Unfortunately, I've played too little tennis to give you an expert answer, but I'll give it a go anyway. The two main differences that I can think of are these: (1) The distance to the ball In squash, you generally want to stand closer to the ball when hitting it, to give maximum strength to your swing. In tennis, you need to be able to spin/curl the ball ...


4

Your first scenario is legal (front wall first, then side wall, then opponent's half). The second is not (side wall, then front wall, then opponent's half). PDF of the rules is linked at the bottom. Rule 5 (The Serve) says the following about a legal serve (5.7): A serve is good if: 5.7.3 the ball is struck directly to the front wall, hitting it ...


4

I would've thought that the combination of contact lenses and goggles would be a good solution as long as you can get used to wearing contacts. Anecdotally, I know plenty of racket-sport players who use contact lenses instead of glasses, my wife included. She insists they are better than glasses particularly because when wearing glasses, the ball/shuttle ...


4

I coach high school squash and run into this occasionally. The most common thing players do is to wipe their hands along the sole of their shoe, much like you'll see basketball players doing sometimes. A second practice that I've seen but that I discourage in my players is to drag/swipe one's palm along the wall. It works, but it's pretty rude in my book....


3

Well, i can't estimate how equal Badminton and Squash are, but maybe you can nevertheless profit somehow: I've been playing Badminton over a year with glasses and additionally, I've been using them also in my sports course in high school since approximately 3 years or so. Basically, I'd suggest you to use "plastic glasses". I don't know the official term ...


3

The rules are a bit complex. The word "let" is mentioned 39 times in the online US Squash Rules. Under rule 12, Interference, here are some of the more common uses of "Let", "No Let" and "Stroke": The player is entitled to a let if he or she could have returned the ball and the opponent has made every effort to avoid the interference. The player is ...


3

I play in safety glasses without suffering unduly from fogging, although I often sweat heavily. If it occasionally happens, I clean them with a dry handkerchief. I think it's a feature of quality squash glasses that they are designed to allow air flow. Perhaps changing the model you use might help. I also wear a "bandana" twisted up and tied around my ...


3

one of the main reasons for not wearing goggles/eye protection in squash is inconvenience. This is mainly due to the eye protection fogging up due to body heat and perspiration, requiring the player to wipe and clean the glasses. This causes breaks in play and concentration which most players consider a huge disadvantage. Because this occurs on a regular ...


3

Both badminton and squash are played on similar surfaces and both require quick changes of direction. They both require shoes with flexible, grippy and non-marking soles. Shoes marketed as for badminton shoes might be lighter as there is more focus on jumping than in squash, but the variation is minimal and mostly just marketing/labelling. (Tennis shoes on ...


3

If you are not already, use sweatbands on the wrists to prevent it running down from your arms to your hands. If the racquet is older, the grip may need replacing. Consider using one moulded to your hand or with ridging that relies less on friction alone. Finally, obtain advice from an exercise professional about how to develop the muscles in your forearm ...


3

No, you can't let it bounce. No, you don't have to release it from the hand. World Squash rules (effective at January 2019) state in section 5 The Serve, 5.7 A serve is good, if: 5.7.1 the server drops or throws the ball from a hand or racket and strikes it correctly on a first or further attempt before it touches anything else; "Anything else" ...


3

Summary: In table tennis, going to an odd number is part of removing serve advantage. For badminton and squash, the earliest rationales are probably lost to history, but they both started from a scoring system documented as early as 1872. Otherwise, this seems to be an old tradition not limited to racket sports, though their stability probably helped ...


2

The previous answer sums up the aspects of buying a squash racket very well, but here are some additional thoughts. What has to be recognized when buying a squash racket is that it's very personal, and it depends a lot on your strengths/weaknesses as a player, as well as your level. The problem with buying a racket as a beginner is that it's hard to ...


2

Regarding squash, it is perfectly alright to switch your hands while playing a shot. You can use both your hands too. Here is a video which shows that it is allowed.


2

You can definitely do this in table tennis. Andrej Grubba, a Polish table tennis pro used to do this quite often. Recently I have seen Timo Boll doing this in a real match. The Chinese players don't do this during the match because their coaches will not be happy.


2

The 1st scenario is valid but the 2nd scenario is invalid. Excerpt from the world squash federation site: Yes - the ball on being served can hit the back wall or a sidewall before hitting the floor (ground). Of course it has to hit the front wall first between the service and out lines. Visit http://www.worldsquash.org/ for more info. Taken from ...


2

I am predominantly a tournament racquetball player but I also love playing squash. Eye protection during racquetball tournaments is mandatory. That is, if you are not prepared to wear eye protection (closed lenses only) then you are NOT allowed to play in the tournament. It is quite sad that sanctioned squash tournaments do not legislate this as well. It ...


2

There is no rule in tennis stopping players from switching the racquet between hands to hit a forehand (or backhand) from both sides. It is extremely rare in tennis (especially among the pro ranks) to see someone who is ambidextrous and can hit a forehand with both hands. What is more common (but still not very common) is to see a player that hits with 2 ...


2

As per section 4.3 under the rules of service in squash as laid out by US Squash, the serve is not counted as a fault if the server makes no attempt to strike the ball. 4.3 To serve, a player shall release the ball from either a hand or the racket and then strike it. Should the player make no attempt to strike it after that release, the player shall ...


2

Some Pro players will indeed attempt a kill shot on the return. But not a drop shot, as there is essentially no way that it can be played tightly enough that a fellow pro, in position on the 'T' following their serve, will not only retrieve it but get to the drop sufficiently comfortably that it will gift them control of the rally. The kills you will see ...


1

There are all kinds of players out there. Some are completely quiet, not even calling out scores once in a while, and on the other end of the spectrum some comment and joke around without pause. There is one kind that annoys me very much - the swearing ones who seem to have no fun at all. What you are describing is very common, in my experience, and you ...


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