25

Yes, it is LEGAL to switch racket "handed-ness" during play. From the USTA web site: Q. I am a left-handed tennis player. During play, I have found that I can hit the tennis ball almost as well with my right hand as I do with my left. Do USTA rules forbid players to switch hands during play? A. No. You can play with either hand. In fact, three-...


18

Actually, yes, it would be your point if it hits your opponent before touching the ground - but only if the ball has not passed the end of the table already. Rule 2.10.01.03: if, after he or she has made a service or a return, the ball touches anything other than the net assembly before being struck by an opponent; and Rule 2.10.01.04: if the ...


15

My understanding after reading the rules is: as far as the touch does not move the table it should be O.K. otherwise it's a point to the opponent. The last three (in italic) points govern the "contact": 2.10 A POINT 2.10.01 Unless the rally is a let, a player shall score a point: 2.10.01.01 if an opponent fails to make a correct service; ...


14

In tennis, rule #24, which covers all the scenarios in which a player loses a point, does not forbid a player from switching the hand that holds the racket. 24. PLAYER LOSES POINT The point is lost if: a. The player serves two consecutive faults; or b. The player does not return the ball in play before it bounces twice consecutively; or c. ...


13

In professional play - there are rules about how many points (6) must be played in between towel breaks (to wipe off sweat and what not). The "hand rub" is one tactic or ritual used to wipe a sweaty hand off on the table - usually up near the net on a part of the table the ball is not likely to come in contact with. It doesn't necessarily mean their hand is ...


13

A let in table tennis is any rally that does not end in a score. The "net service" that you described, where the ball on the service touches the net as it goes over, is one type of let. (All of the circumstances that result in a let are listed in the ITTF Handbook, section 2.09.) By definition, a let does not result in a point scored. Additionally, the ...


13

Most sources, including the history presented on the website of the International Table Tennis Federation (ITTF), agree that the game was developed in the 1880's as a variant to the already-popular lawn tennis, which in turn derives from so-called "real tennis", an earlier game, hailing back to medieval times, whose name is derived from French "Tenez!", ...


12

Yes, you can use your hand to hit the ball, but only if it is your racket hand and below the wrist. A quote of the rules state: It is considered legal to hit the ball with your fingers, or with your racket hand below the wrist, or even any part of the bat.(Law 2.5.7) This means that you could quite legally return the ball by: hitting it with the ...


8

Some players stomp during the serve to hide the sound of the racquet hitting the ball. The sound of the contact can often clue a receiver into the pace and spin of a serve. Other players merely stomp as a natural motion as they try to impart spin onto the ball.


8

See this page with Table Tennis rules. Specifically there are two rules to be read here. First, a legal serve is defined as: 2.06.03 As the ball is falling the server shall strike it so that it touches first his or her court and then, after passing over or around the net assembly, touches directly the receiver's court; in doubles, the ball shall touch ...


8

It is perfectly legal in table tennis to change the racket to other hand during a point. Though uncommon and extremely difficult, it does provide a few exciting moments for the spectators. ITTF has compiled a video capturing these exciting moments. And if it is legal for a point, it should be legal for a set and a match as well.


8

International Table Tennis Federation (ITTF) rules in regards to the table go to 2.01 ("The Table"), or playing surface are fairly straightforward and short. A ball is in play if it touches any part of the top of the table. 2.01.02 The playing surface shall not include the vertical sides of the tabletop. Therefore, anything not considered the "top" ...


8

There is no difference. Ping pong is simply another name for table tennis. The two terms are used by the vast majority of people interchangably. Historically, the name Ping Pong was a trademarked name owned by Jaques of London and by Parker Brothers in the U.S. Table tennis was the generic name for the sport, and is the official name as recognized by the ...


8

No, this is not legal. Quoting from the Table Tennis England Rules of the game: Strike – 2.5.7 – A player strikes the ball if he touches it in play with his racket, held in the hand, or with his racket hand below the wrist. (my emphasis) and Procedure – 2.7.1 – The ball, having been served or returned, shall be struck so that it touches the opponent’s ...


7

Yes, the receiver needs to wait until the ball touches his playing area, otherwise it counts as being obstructed. You can read about it in table tennis rules 2.05.08 A player obstructs the ball if he or she, or anything he or she wears or carries, touches it in play when it is above or travelling towards the playing surface, not having touched his or ...


7

In doubles you must serve diagonally, but in singles you can serve in any direction. The rules for service are in Section 2.06 of the ITTF Handbook: 2.06 THE SERVICE 2.06.01 Service shall start with the ball resting freely on the open palm of the server's stationary free hand. 2.06.02 The server shall then project the ball near ...


7

you and I have a lot in common - playing both table tennis and regular tennis. My answer to this question (from years of observing the effects of playing both sports) is both yes and no. Some things are the same (and help across both sports) and some are different and don't help that much. The similarities: Balance - both require good balance and using ...


7

No you can't change paddles mid game, according to the International Table Tennis Federation Handbook for 2017: 3.4.2.4 A racket shall not be replaced during an individual match unless it is accidentally damaged so badly that it cannot be used; if this happens the damaged racket shall be replaced immediately by another which the player has ...


6

The table-tennis version of a tennis 'let' is sometimes called a 'net.' In general, a 'let' in table tennis is when the rally is stopped for some reason and no point is awarded. Examples of Lets include 2.9.1.1 if in service the ball, in passing over or around the net assembly, touches it, provided the service is otherwise good or the ball is ...


6

Yellow and red cards were first introduced into the game of table tennis in 1991. Yellow and red cards are shown by umpires and referees to players and coaches who break the rules or misbehave during the course of a match or tournament. Rule 3.05 covers the area of discipline in table tennis, and it applies to both players and coaches. The ...


6

I would recommend an Elo Rating System. This system is primarily used in rating of chess players and ranking of players in games like badminton, tennis and table tennis. Each player has a rating score and his/her score increases when they win and decreases when they lose. The margin of change in rating depends on the rating of the opponent. A win against a ...


6

In organized table tennis "masking" your serve is illegal. Your hand must be held flat and open, palm to the ceiling, with the ball resting on it. Then keeping the open palm you must toss the ball up at least 6 inches into the air. The ball must come back down to the same level before you can hit it with the racket. Why is this? Well if I were allowed ...


6

See this question answered previously. The ball cannot be hit by someone's chest - only their hand (that is holding the paddle) can contact the ball. Who wins a point where the ball hits a player in the chest would depend on whether or not the ball had already gone over the edge boundary of the table yet or not. If the person was leaning over the table when ...


6

I realize this is an older question, but I think my answer might be useful to other people with the same or similar questions. Anti-spin rubber can take the spinniest of serves and return it virtually deadened. Several rubber manufacturers create anti-spin rubber. It is designed for exactly what you're looking for, however there are some disadvantages as ...


6

I've heard reports of amateur players who are ambidextrous swapping a tennis racket from one hand to the other to have two forehands. I don't know about squash and tennis, but in badminton there's no rule banning moving the racket between your left and right hands. The reason is probably because, except perhaps at beginner level, there's no advantage to ...


6

A complete amateur here... I would say, it's far easier to tell the difference between the ball hitting the table or missing it, than between the ball touching a line than missing it. The balls just bounce and fly so quickly. And you judge basically by seeing whether the trajectory has changed (or by hearing). Spotting where the ball was at the moment of ...


6

Up until recently, all table tennis balls were made of celluloid. ITTF has mandated a change to a new ball, known as the plastic ball or poly ball. The deadline for the use of the plastic ball was July 1, 2014, and the Belarus Open was the first event to use the plastic ball. From this point on, all World Title and ITTF sanctioned events will use the ...


6

No, then you lose the point. According to ITTF's Rules (The International Table Tennis Federation's Handbook 2019 v2): 2.10 A POINT 2.10.1 Unless the rally is a let, a player shall score a point 2.10.1.11 if an opponent's free hand touches the playing surface;


5

Since this is your custom tournament and the participants are your friends, you can afford to experiment with the rules. My suggestion would be to start off with this, and whenever you find it biased in some way, just make a few rules changes and proceed. Without having a trial run, you will not be able to find out the drawbacks, and you may also find that ...


5

I strongly suggest a ladder ranking system. This is a common system used in workplace and other community areas that provides for asynchronous tournament play. Basically order your players 1-x and then any player can challenge a player higher on the ladder than themselves (within some boundary). The tournament proceeds via a system of challenges. Any ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible