33

I've played with 1, 2 and 3 star balls. I'm not sure 4 or 5 star exist. Some companies have brands that they say are 4-star but they aren't actually rated above 3-star because a 3 star rating means the highest quality ball possible. The factors that go into the rating are durability, visibility of the seam on the ball, balance of the ball and elasticity. The ...


25

Yes, it is LEGAL to switch racket "handed-ness" during play. From the USTA web site: Q. I am a left-handed tennis player. During play, I have found that I can hit the tennis ball almost as well with my right hand as I do with my left. Do USTA rules forbid players to switch hands during play? A. No. You can play with either hand. In fact, three-...


20

The oil is used to increase the grip or "tackiness" of the rubber surface of the racquet. You can actually just use ordinary oils (like sunflower oil) but the oils vendors sell are manufactured for the specific purpose of applying to table tennis rubber. Anyway, you want to use a medium width brush (like something you'd use to paint model airplanes or ...


20

I know that in tennis you are allowed to use either hand to hit the ball with the racquet during any point, set or match. You may not use more than one racquet during any single point, though (though you are allowed to switch racquets between points). And racquet throwing (for the purpose of hitting the ball) is not allowed - the racquet must be in your hand ...


18

Actually, yes, it would be your point if it hits your opponent before touching the ground - but only if the ball has not passed the end of the table already. Rule 2.10.01.03: if, after he or she has made a service or a return, the ball touches anything other than the net assembly before being struck by an opponent; and Rule 2.10.01.04: if the ...


17

According to the official rules (referenced here): Rule 2.04.06 The surface of the covering material on a side of the blade, or of a side of the blade if it is left uncovered, shall be matt, bright red on one side and black on the other. The reasons for this rule are described here: The Two Colour Rule Since 1 July 1986 the rules of ...


15

My understanding after reading the rules is: as far as the touch does not move the table it should be O.K. otherwise it's a point to the opponent. The last three (in italic) points govern the "contact": 2.10 A POINT 2.10.01 Unless the rally is a let, a player shall score a point: 2.10.01.01 if an opponent fails to make a correct service; ...


14

In tennis, rule #24, which covers all the scenarios in which a player loses a point, does not forbid a player from switching the hand that holds the racket. 24. PLAYER LOSES POINT The point is lost if: a. The player serves two consecutive faults; or b. The player does not return the ball in play before it bounces twice consecutively; or c. ...


13

In professional play - there are rules about how many points (6) must be played in between towel breaks (to wipe off sweat and what not). The "hand rub" is one tactic or ritual used to wipe a sweaty hand off on the table - usually up near the net on a part of the table the ball is not likely to come in contact with. It doesn't necessarily mean their hand is ...


13

Most sources, including the history presented on the website of the International Table Tennis Federation (ITTF), agree that the game was developed in the 1880's as a variant to the already-popular lawn tennis, which in turn derives from so-called "real tennis", an earlier game, hailing back to medieval times, whose name is derived from French "Tenez!", ...


12

According to this site, 3 star ball are the ones that meet the ITTF's competition ball specifications for quality and consistency. 1 and 2 star balls are often the discarded balls from a 3 star production run.


12

Yes, you can use your hand to hit the ball, but only if it is your racket hand and below the wrist. A quote of the rules state: It is considered legal to hit the ball with your fingers, or with your racket hand below the wrist, or even any part of the bat.(Law 2.5.7) This means that you could quite legally return the ball by: hitting it with the ...


12

A let in table tennis is any rally that does not end in a score. The "net service" that you described, where the ball on the service touches the net as it goes over, is one type of let. (All of the circumstances that result in a let are listed in the ITTF Handbook, section 2.09.) By definition, a let does not result in a point scored. Additionally, the ...


10

According to the USATT Rules 2.9 A Let 2.9.1 The rally shall be a let 2.9.1.1 if in service the ball, in passing over or around the net assembly, touches it, provided the service is otherwise good or the ball is obstructed by the receiver or his/her partner; Which means you must serve again if other than touching the net the service would ...


8

It is perfectly legal in table tennis to change the racket to other hand during a point. Though uncommon and extremely difficult, it does provide a few exciting moments for the spectators. ITTF has compiled a video capturing these exciting moments. And if it is legal for a point, it should be legal for a set and a match as well.


8

Some players stomp during the serve to hide the sound of the racquet hitting the ball. The sound of the contact can often clue a receiver into the pace and spin of a serve. Other players merely stomp as a natural motion as they try to impart spin onto the ball.


8

The video is a little misleading actually because it's tough to notice exactly what happened at the end of the point. In tennis you actually are NOT allowed to hit the ball with your head - only the racquet. What happened in the video you linked to is that Federer's opponent (Juan Martin Del Potro) didn't get to Federer's backhand shot before it bounced ...


8

International Table Tennis Federation (ITTF) rules in regards to the table go to 2.01 ("The Table"), or playing surface are fairly straightforward and short. A ball is in play if it touches any part of the top of the table. 2.01.02 The playing surface shall not include the vertical sides of the tabletop. Therefore, anything not considered the "top" ...


7

If the serve touches the net, it is a let, and you must serve again. If it touches the net and lands on the floor, you lose a point. If the serve goes into the net, you lose the point.


7

Regulations state the following (excerpt): 2.02 THE NET ASSEMBLY 2.02.01 The net assembly shall consist of the net, its suspension and the supporting posts, including the clamps attaching them to the table. 2.02.02 The net shall be suspended by a cord attached at each end to an upright post 15.25cm high, the outside limits of the post ...


7

There are generally only 2 options to counter an opponents topspin shot. Hit topspin back (the aggressive tactic) Put underspin on your shot and "slice" it back (slow it down by putting lots of opposite-direction spin on your shot). This would be the defensive, controlled tactic. A heavy chop serve is entirely different. You have to get under the ball ...


7

See this page with Table Tennis rules. Specifically there are two rules to be read here. First, a legal serve is defined as: 2.06.03 As the ball is falling the server shall strike it so that it touches first his or her court and then, after passing over or around the net assembly, touches directly the receiver's court; in doubles, the ball shall touch ...


7

In doubles you must serve diagonally, but in singles you can serve in any direction. The rules for service are in Section 2.06 of the ITTF Handbook: 2.06 THE SERVICE 2.06.01 Service shall start with the ball resting freely on the open palm of the server's stationary free hand. 2.06.02 The server shall then project the ball near ...


7

you and I have a lot in common - playing both table tennis and regular tennis. My answer to this question (from years of observing the effects of playing both sports) is both yes and no. Some things are the same (and help across both sports) and some are different and don't help that much. The similarities: Balance - both require good balance and using ...


7

There is no difference. Ping pong is simply another name for table tennis. The two terms are used by the vast majority of people interchangably. Historically, the name Ping Pong was a trademarked name owned by Jaques of London and by Parker Brothers in the U.S. Table tennis was the generic name for the sport, and is the official name as recognized by the ...


7

No, this is not legal. Quoting from the Table Tennis England Rules of the game: Strike – 2.5.7 – A player strikes the ball if he touches it in play with his racket, held in the hand, or with his racket hand below the wrist. (my emphasis) and Procedure – 2.7.1 – The ball, having been served or returned, shall be struck so that it touches the opponent’s ...


6

Although I can't verify this, it could be for balance purposes. I know that in tennis (related sport), when you come into net to hit a volley, good technique states that you should "stomp" with your (assuming a right-handed player) left foot for a forehand volley and stomp with your right foot for a backhand volley because it helps you mentally and ...


6

One article discussed various solo table tennis training drills. Topics included: Serving Practice Shadow Play and Ghosting Solo Footwork Drills Video Footage Analysis Table Tennis Robots Each topic had several practical pointers and tips. One table tennis forum post dealt with this question and had two suggestions: Shadow play (mentioned ...


6

Article from allabouttabletennis.com explains it pretty well. Generally speaking, the main 3 rules that most people playing doubles observe are the required serve location (to the opposite diagonal section of the table) and switching sides between service games/servers. Then of course, you also alternate which player has to hit the ball each time (the ...


6

Yellow and red cards were first introduced into the game of table tennis in 1991. Yellow and red cards are shown by umpires and referees to players and coaches who break the rules or misbehave during the course of a match or tournament. Rule 3.05 covers the area of discipline in table tennis, and it applies to both players and coaches. The ...


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