24

It would certainly be allowed, but it would likely be a failed strategy in soccer. In professional soccer, you only get 3 substitutes per game. If you burn one on pulling out your keeper, then if you accomplish your goal and tie the score, if you go to overtime, you're stuck with no keeper on the field. So subbing in a field player for a keeper is ...


13

The captain and (during his absence on ice) alternate captains (not “assistant”) are players designated to be the point of contact between the referee and the team. Only these players are allowed to discuss with the Referee any questions relating to the interpretation of rules. This privilege applies only to the respective captain/alternate captain who is ...


12

As has been noted, keepers do sometimes come up to act as an attacker during the game, though they are never really subbed out for another attacking player. A couple things to keep in mind from The Laws of the Game. Players Page 15: "A match is played by two teams, each consisting of not more than eleven players, one of whom is the goalkeeper" Page 16: "...


12

I have been in what appears to be this exact same situation (captaining a social indoor cricket team). There is no single right answer, but here are some ideas that appeared to work. First, clarify your approach upfront, before you form the team or enter it into the competition. If you said you'd share the games around, then you should stick with that, I ...


10

So I had to dig up a bit on the regulations regarding the whole thing. So apparently while Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Englad being different countries, they are under the same international identity in the form of British passports. So that fact, together with the fact that there is no national team for the UK, means that any British citizen can ...


10

You don't see this in soccer. If a team is desperate to score a goal, the goalie comes out of his net and plays in the middle or front. For example when there is a corner kick, the goalie could go all the way to the opposite box to score. However, this happens often in indoor soccer. The goalie comes out at the end of the game replaced by an attacker. But ...


9

The captain is usually picked by the manager, and it's up to him to decide based on what he thinks is best for the team. There is a lot of different reasons for choosing a captain, all based on different managers preferences. Some reason might be these (not a complete list): Experience Age Leadership abilities Position Influence on others Tactical ...


7

Captaincy can be considered as a symbolic responsibility. Technically on the pitch, he's just another player who's subject to the rules. But there are some unwritten rules that he's also subject to. He is expected to calm his mates when they get unnecessarily aggressive on the field. He's supposed to take care of his team's diplomacy (The ceremony at the ...


6

Yes, it does happen, although not very often. Goal difference can be important at the end of the season, so if your team was losing in a regular game, there's no point going all out to tie when the risk of conceding a goal is very high without a goalie in the net. On the other hand, during cup matches where a team is about to be put out unless they score a ...


6

German isn't really a significant language in Belgium. All players will speak either French or Dutch. English is increasingly becoming an unifying language in the country as the Dutch of Wallonians is virtually non existent and despite some knowledge of French being widespread in Flanders it tends to be weaker than their English ability. I somehow doubt ...


6

Each team must have either 1 Captain and 2 Assistant Captains OR 3 Assistant Captains (One extra Assistant Captain to make up for the vacancy of the Captain's spot.) The role of the players with the "Letters" on their sweater is to get information from the referee. When a penalty is called, usually the Captain of each team meets with the referee in the ...


5

I'm not familiar enough with Cricket to offer a specific, concrete solution. However, in games like softball or soccer, it's not at all uncommon to have people split their time in the game. So, person A plays the first half of the game while person B plays the second half. In the case of soccer, it may be delineated by periods, while in softball it may be ...


5

I realize your question isn't about ice hockey, but there is one advantage in the rules that the home team gets in the NHL. The home team gets "last change". This means that, on a faceoff, for instance, when both teams are changing, the visiting team has to make their line change before the home team does. This gives the home team the ability to tailor ...


5

Teams may also find it smart to tank in order to avoid playoff mediocrity. There is very little point for a team with subpar talent to make a low seed, only to get a first round exit. The only reason they would want to do this is if they already have solid, young players (see Oklahoma City Thunder 2009-2010), and they want them to gain some experience. On ...


5

KYP "know your personnel" is indeed a thing and one of the important point guard skills. Your question is multi-faceted, though, the correct answer is dependent on the particular situation you're in. For example, does your team play to win or just to make everyone happy, if happiness == touching the ball? If you play to win, the people getting looked over ...


5

Tackles, and in particular left tackles, tend to be the elite positions on the offensive line. The position requires linemen to generally have the best size (height, arm reach) and athletic ability (agility, technique) in order to deal with one on one pass rushers. Left tackle in particular is crucial as this lineman protects the blindside of a right-handed ...


5

From Law 1 (The Players) 2. Nomination of players Each captain shall nominate his players in writing to one of the umpires before the toss. No player may be changed after the nomination without the consent of the opposing captain. So the captain has to decide the playing eleven before the toss. Normally the playing eleven is not changed once it is ...


4

A point that hasn't been made in the other answers is that this tactic would be numerically much less effective in football than in ice hockey because of the larger teams. In ice hockey, pulling the goalie gives you six outfield players against five, which is a 20% increase over your opponent. In football, it would only give you eleven against ten, a 10% ...


4

In soccer the goalkeeper can act just as another player. He can also use his hands in the penalty area, but he can play anywhere. It is relatively usual in play-out matches that the goalkeeper goes to attack, when there is a corner kick in the last minute and they lose by just one goal. This way the goalkeeper can try to score with a header. For instance, ...


4

From what I know, you cannot literally swap the designated captain, but that doesn't stop the captain handing over temporary charge to another player, similar to if a captain goes off the field and the vice captain takes over. An umpire cannot say to a player 'no, you can't change the fielding positions cause you're not captain'. This happened in the BBL, ...


4

Seems to me this is pretty similar to how our park district does things for sports/gymnastics classes/teams. They have a slightly different approach. What they do is have an early signup period, during which the only option is to confirm your enrollment for the next season/year/whatever of the exact class/sport you're in: same exact schedule, etc. So if ...


4

I've been through this kind of issue with other sports, and the best solution I know of is to make it clear why you're playing the game. That may sound obvious, but once you get round to asking people, you discover that they actually have significantly different motivations: Some players are there because they want to play the game at the highest level they ...


3

Well, obviously the answer to your question depends on the type of game you are referring to. On a more professional level, a point guard has to consider what the next move is. In other words, the PG has to have the answer to "Why am I passing this ball to him/her?" clearly defined. If it's a set-offense then it's actually pretty clear, PG passes to X and ...


3

I would like to add a bit to @DSeita's answer; in many cases the old PG-SG-SF-PF-C categorization of players is a bit outdated. Historically the roles would be defined something like this (simplified of course): PG: play-maker, distributes the ball, typically the best player with the "in-game intelligence" and the very high dribbling skills (an old school ...


3

According to The Sun: Kevin de Bruyne is a Flemish-speaker from Ghent whilst Axel Witsel speaks only French (he was born in Liège). [...] Romelu Lukaku can speak six – Flemish, English, French, Portuguese, Spanish and Swahili. But some of the French-speaking players are monolingual. English is reportedly used as the common language in the ...


2

While rare, it does happen. Generally speaking, after an intensive match players are exhausted, but that probably won't apply to the goalkeeper, so if he were a fairly good field player it may be worth for him to leave the box. I've seen it happen (without an official role switch) during the just finished World Championship in the last minutes of one match, ...


2

Give points based on relative position to the last place team, not the first place. Then players can score more only if more people play - the result is that those in contention for overall places will encourage people to come so they can try to catch up faster. Give a multiplier for points based on consecutive weeks played. You might step it at every K ...


2

Even though this question already has an accepted answer, I'd like to add mine. These days, basketball positions are generally defined both by a player's role and their size relative to their four teammates on the court. So out of the five players from a given team currently on the court, the PG is usually the shortest, followed by the SG, then the SF, ...


2

This question has been asked numerous times, so I'll try to explain just the things that immediately pop in my mind when I think of center or power foward. The center is typically designated as a team's tallest and/or biggest (though often both) player on the floor at a time. An ideal center may stay close to the rim, play defense, block shots, rebound ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible