23

There are only two (different) actions when you are permitted to reach beyond (over) the net: blocking and attack hit. After making an attack hit, you are allowed to pass your hand beyond the net, but the contact must have been made within your own playing space. I.e. you are not allowed to touch the ball beyond the net in this case. (Obviously, for this to ...


12

The official rules (as you cite in your question) prohibit screening. Unfortunately the rules themselves do not give an exact definition that you could use. In referee trainings, however, you will get more info on how to judge screening. Everything that helps the serving team to prepare for defense is allowed. So each player of that team can take any ...


11

Yes, if you attack the ball, and the blocker makes any contact with the ball, and it comes back to your side, then your hits are reset (otherwise a block to your side would be a guaranteed point for them every time) and you can once again take up to three hits to put the ball over the net. You'll notice that while your team is attacking, back row players ...


10

On the 2012 FIVB Congress, new rules valid from 2013 (but see update below) were approved; probably the most visible change is going to be the change regarding the reception of service. Currently, at the first hit of the team including the service, double contact is not called (provided that the contacts occur during one action, see rule 9.2.3.2), which ...


9

In the diagram you've drawn, this would result in losing the point. The ball has passed entirely to the other side of the net through the crossing space so your team is no longer allowed to play the ball. Quoting from Rule 9 of the 2015-2016 Rules of the Game: Each team must play within its own playing area and space (except Rule 10.1.2). However, if ...


8

There's not going to be anything really governing 'serving hard' as ethical or not ethical. I played volleyball for 6 years, so I eventually had a pretty good serve as well. In PE class, or at parties (4th of July, etc.) that tend to have a volleyball net up, I would rather do Float Serves instead of just a power serve/ jump serve. It's less cocky looking, ...


8

The player with the different coloured jersey is the "libero" - a specialised defensive player who is able to be freely substituted for any back court player. They can never rotate to the front court (if that would happen, the player they've replaced must re-enter the court), engage in any kind of attack from above the height of the net (even a back row ...


8

Welcome to the "Art of Refereeing"! I think the best answer to this is from the foreward to the FIVB rulebook (page 10): a good referee will use the rules to make the competition a fulfilling experience for all concerned. Double touches and carries are always going to be judgement calls on the part of the referee, and how you make those calls should ...


7

Yes, this is true. When playing co-ed indoor volleyball (also called Mixed Six), anytime your team has more than one hit, one of the hits, not including blocking, must be made by a female. There is also a provision in the rulebook for "reverse co-ed" (reverse Mixed Six) where one of the touches must be made by a male. From the 2013-2015 Domestic ...


7

It's a bit hard to be specific without more details, but the reason is the same as everything else: to gain a tactical advantage. Some common examples: If one of your substitutes is better at serve reception and/or defensively than one of your starters, you put the substitute on when they are in the back row, and then reverse the substitution when they ...


7

The number on the paddle is the number of the player who is being substituted. This is important due to the volleyball rules on reverse substitutions: if in a set, player B replaces player A, then the only substitution which can be made involving players A and B for the rest of the set is for player A to replace player B again. For example, you cannot do the ...


6

You are carefully describing the position of the ball in the moment of your attack hit and in the moment of the defensive contact. However, it is not important. The decisive criterion in this case is not the point of contact with the ball, but the position of the blocker’s body. If any part of the blocker’s body (usually but not necessarily hands) is higher ...


6

Normally, if a player touches the ball with two different parts of the body in succession (not simultaneously), it is a Double Contact fault. However, the block and the first team hit are exceptions to this. During the block and during the first hit, a player can contact the ball more than once, as long as the contacts are all part of one action. From ...


6

There is no specific mention in the official FIVB rules of a requirement to roll the ball back under the net to the opponent. However, actions which are contrary to "good manners" are considered rude conduct under rule 21.2.1 and therefore subject (on a first offence) to a penalty of point and service to the opponent. A second instance of rude conduct by the ...


6

What you describe is called a "joust" (in American terminology), and it is legal. From Team USA's "Guide to Volleyball Basics": Joust - when two players on opposing sides attempt to block the ball at the same time pushing it onto each other’s side of the net. Apparently jousting used to be illegal, but this page says it was made legal in 1999: 14.2.4 ...


6

Is it possible for a libero to score point during a volleyball match? Yes. There is nothing in the rules, in particular Rule 19 "The Libero Player", which says that a libero cannot score points. The libero cannot hit the ball This is incorrect. Quoting from Rule 19.3.1.2: [The Libero] is not allowed to complete an attack hit from anywhere [...] if at ...


6

The obvious answer here is "ask your coach". If they can't tell you how to be a better athlete, then they're not the right coach for you no matter how good their technical volleyball coaching might be.


6

From FIVB rules of the game 12.4.3 At the moment of the service hit or take-off for a jump service, the server must not touch the court (the end line included) or the floor outside the service zone. After the hit, he/she may step or land outside the service zone, or inside the court. So in the case are your writing (landing on baseline after the ...


5

This is specifically defined in section 13 of the official rules: 13.1.1 All actions which direct the ball towards the opponent, with the exception of service and block, are considered as attack hits. Your set directed the ball towards the opponent, therefore it is an attack hit and therefore it can be blocked. You may also wish to refer to 14.3: ...


5

A block occurs when a front-row player close to the net reaches higher than the net and contacts the ball as it is coming over from the opponent. A block attempt is when the blocker reaches higher than the net but does not contact the ball, and a completed block is when the blocker does make contact with the ball. Block contacts can be by more than one ...


5

As your "dink" :) was your team's third hit, the opponent can then reach over the net to make a block. Reason being, once the third hit is made it's a free-ball, and the opponent is then granted ability to reach over and make contact. Of course, contact with the net is still illegal, but as far as I can tell by your description - the opponent's play was ...


5

Spiking in volleyball is much more about timing and approach than hand placement. I would first focus on learning when to jump and swing in regard to the set and flight of the ball. If you can't contact the ball at the right time, then it doesn't really matter what you hit it with. Personally, after practicing approach and swing, the "hitting" ...


5

First of all, there are no definite "rules" for determining the quality of attack or reception. Scouts use certain programs (like this) to collect information about how well players performed in a match but the assessment scheme employed may be different from program to program. Concerning the attack, yes, scoring is obviously optimal, be it by directly ...


5

First of all, it’s far from “any touch of the net is a fault”. The actual rule (11.3.1) is that “Contact with the net by a player between the antennae, during the action of playing the ball, is a fault.” (emphasis mine). The next paragraph explains the action of playing the ball includes take-off, hit (or attempt), and landing. That includes touches by the ...


5

This is a fault by team 1 and they lose the point; it is covered by rule 13.2.1 of the official FIVB rules: 13.2 Faults of the attack hit 13.2.1 A player hits the ball within the playing space of the opposing team. For what it's worth, there is nothing beach specific about this - exactly the same rule exists for indoor volleyball (except that it is ...


4

In practice, the trajectory of the ball is taken in consideration as well, i.e. both the ball and the serving player must be blocked before action is taken. And considering that the ball trajectory starts quite high wit a jump serve, most referees will not interpret this as the ball being blocked from sight. So only when... the service is not a jump ...


4

A back-row player (one of the three players in the back row at the time of the serve, including the server) is not allowed to block. If they do, it is a blocking fault and results in a point for the other team. From the FIVB Official Volleyball Rules 2013-2016, Rule 14.6 (Blocking Faults): 14.6 Blocking Faults 14.6.2 A back-row player or a Libero ...


4

You can tell your friend to learn the rules. It is not a fault to set the ball back over the net on the first contact. Two exceptions to this: If you are playing beach volleyball as opposed to indoor volleyball, you cannot set the first contact at all - it doesn't matter if it goes over the net or not. You may not play the serve directly back over the net ...


4

It's just a ritual. Some players hold the ball straight in front of them (like Marcus Böhme, Maxim Mikhailov), some bounce it, some even talk to themselves (like Christian Fromm from the German National team). It helps concentration. It helps you focus on your serve and it let's you take full advantage of the eight seconds available to perform your serve. ...


4

The most important feature are: a wide lateral vision (so bigger curved lens than normal glasses) and an excellent grip on the head. I can suggest deformable plastic linked to an elastic to wear perfectly (only if you feel comfortable with it). These featuresare not so prevalent because the athletes usually wear contact lenses. Here you can find info on ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible