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11

If a batsman carries the stumps deliberately, he is actually obstructing the field. Law 37 (Obstructing the field): 1. Out Obstructing the field Either batsman is out Obstructing the field if he wilfully attempts to obstruct or distract the fielding side by word or action. In particular, but not solely, it shall be regarded as obstruction and either ...


7

There should not be a change of strike if the batsman is bowled. The umpire made the correct decision by letting the new batsman face the next ball. This is covered by Law 18, which states that the rule of batsmen crossing only applies if the dismissal is Caught, Obstructing the field or Run out. 11. Batsman returning to original end (a) When a batsman is ...


6

Is there any bowler who take 10 wicket haul in any kind of international format either Test, ODI or T20? At present, only two players you have mentioned have taken 10 wickets in an innings in any type of international matches. Best bowling figure in ODI is: 8.0-3-19-8 by Chaminda Vaas of Sri Lanka vs Zimbabwe as Colombo (SSC) on 8 Dec 2001. Have a look ...


6

As per the ICC playing conditions of Umpire reviewing system, still the bowling team will win the match. If following a review request, an original decision of 'Out' is changed to 'Not Out', then the ball is still deemed to have become dead when the original decision was made (as per Law 23.1(a)(iii)). The only benefit that the batting team can gain ...


5

The meaning of the dead ball is no further actions can be performed after the ball is declared as dead. That means neither batsmen can run nor fielders can run-out them. See Dead ball - Wikipedia In cricket, a dead ball is a particular state of play in which the players may not perform any of the active aspects of the game. In other words, batsmen may ...


5

As I said in my previous answer, Zings, the new high-tech LED stumps, are very costly. The entire set-up during a match costs US$ 40,000. That's why Bronte EcKermann, the inventor of Zings doesn't allow players to uproot them after winning the match. He also denied to take them even after winning the final. But as an exception he said that he will allow MS ...


5

Retired not out If a batsman retires during his innings because of injury, illness or any other unavoidable reasons, and doesn't resume his innings, he is considered as retired not out. He can resume his innings after the wicket is fallen or other batsmen is retired. Retired not out is considered as not out. Retired out If a batsman retires during his ...


5

Mehboob Alam from Nepal took all 10 wickets in a World Cricket League match against Mozambique in 2008. Some very brief commentary on this feat can be found at the Guinness World Records website, and a match report is available on Cricinfo.


5

Not out. You are allowed to defend your wicket. What you cannot do is try to score runs with the second hit.


5

The Laws of Cricket aren't always great at defining what certain terms used within the Laws mean, and I think "crossed" is one of those cases. However, we can use the definition in Law 30.2 which does clearly define which ground belongs to which batsman: 30.2.1 If only one batsman is within a ground, it is his/her ground and will remain so even if ...


4

Law 32 of the Laws of cricket here fair catch (d) a fielder catches the ball after it has touched an umpire, another fielder or the other batsman.


4

In the history of cricket there are only two times a batsman was out by this term retired-out. Both of them are Srilankan cricket players and both the instances were held in a same match. Generally, retired-outs are happened only in warm-up matches where the result is not as much important. So this dismissal term was not included in the standard dismissal ...


4

As per Appendix A (considering the above image) the size chart is as below: Senior Junior -------------------------------------- a 3.49 cm a 3.18 cm b 5.40 cm b 4.60 cm c 2.06 cm c 1.91 cm -------------------------------------- Overall 10.95 cm Overall 9.68 cm --------------------...


4

As you've noted, the most common way for this to occur is a run out while attempting a second (or later) run, but there are a number of other ways: A batsman being out stumped or hit wicket from a wide ball - see clause 16. For a recent example of a stumping from a wide, see India vs Bangladesh in the 2016 World T20: 9.3 Raina to Sabbir Rahman, 1 wide, ...


3

It's very simple. Just keep in mind that the new batsman will take the place of the dismissed batsman. If they have changed the strike, the new batsman will be on the strike in the next over, if they haven't, the new batsman will be on the non strike.


3

Some possibilities are there: If you are looking at not losing a match and making every batsmen out in unique ways without any extras, it is not possible: If the batting team requires more than 1 run: First three batsmen out, as you described, without facing a ball. The next batsman is Stumped out in wide ball so the wicket is fallen and still remain ...


3

Not out Batsman can stop the ball hitting the stumps with his bat but he will be given out if he touches the ball with his hand (the example is steve waugh was judged as out when he tried to stop the ball hitting the wicket with his hand) I would also like to mention one thing about Inzamam's incidence he was given out not because of hitting the ball with ...


3

Law 38 (Run out), section 3: The batsman out [...] is the one whose ground is at the end where the wicket is put down. Law 29 (Batsman out of his ground), section 2(c): If there is no batsman in either ground, then each ground belongs to whichever batsman is nearer to it, or, if the batsmen are level, to whichever batsman was nearer to it immediately ...


3

Well, in international cricket, the most taken by a bowler in a single over is 4 wickets. This has happened six times in Test cricket: Maurice Allom - For England vs New Zealand in 1929 Ken Cranston - For England vs South Africa in 1947 Fred Titmus - For England vs New Zealand in 1965 Chris Old - For England vs Pakistan in 1978 Wasim Akram - For Pakistan ...


2

Its a hat trick for the match not matches. What next someone on 99 not out will get a single next game and claim a 100? Similarly, a hat trick doesn't count for multiple matches.


2

This is super old now, but I figured I'd chip in. There are two different questions here in the context of a switch hit: 1) What about wides? 2) What about LBWs? For the purposes of wides, the switch-hitting striker sacrifices the benefit of the leg side bowling limit. In other words, he effectively has two off sides for the purposes of calling wides. ...


2

There are a couple of ways a batting team can lose a wicket during a dead-ball situation (as is the case immediately after losing a wicket), for example a batsman may retire out. The batsman in question generally cannot return to the field (though a batsman could retire and then return with the permission of the opposing captain) and thus the batting team ...


2

I don't believe either of the answers posted to be entirely correct. The crucial point is that in your scenario, both batsmen reached the crease At this point, Law 29.2(a) comes in effect (as opposed to 29.2(c) as quoted in Spinner's answer): (a) If only one batsman is within a ground (i) it is his ground (ii) it remains his ground even if he is later ...


2

If both batsmen are on the same crease, then in order to get a wicket, fielders must have to break wickets of the other end. In that case, from those two batsmen, the batsman who had reached later to the first side of the crease gets out.


2

This situation comes under the law 37 (Obstructing the field). (emphasis mine) Either batsman is out Obstructing the field if he wilfully attempts to obstruct or distract the fielding side by word or action. In particular, but not solely, it shall be regarded as obstruction and either batsman will be out Obstructing the field if while the ball is in play ...


2

Law 22.4 call of over states that When 6 valid balls have been bowled and when the ball becomes dead, the umpire shall call Over before leaving the wicket. and Law 23.3 states Neither the call of Over, nor the call of Time is to be made until the ball is dead. As umpire already signaled over that means ball is dead and he can't be run out.


2

I don't think you can get run out after the umpire signals over. When the umpire signals over, the six deliveries are all finished, and there is no further play.


2

Since I couldn't find it in the law, I posted a law query to lords.org. The reply I got from them is below. Which says that it is an unlikely scenario though Law 18.11 will apply (as said by @Fillet) and the non-striker will have to go to his original end. Thank you for your email to MCC. This is a somewhat unlikely scenario. If the ball goes high ...


2

According to Law 16.2, 16.3: The bowler’s end umpire shall call Time when the ball is dead on the cessation of play before any interval or interruption and at the conclusion of the match. After the call of Time, the bails shall be removed from both wickets. So, this is the official way to show that the match has been paused or finished.


2

When the LED stumps were first used in the Big Bash League, its Senior Manager had this to say: "These light up stumps are all about enhancing the spectator experience during BBL matches and ensuring that the BBL remains highly entertaining for the fans," BBL Senior Manager Anthony Everard said in a statement. "The stumps do not have any effect ...


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