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I want to shoot targets of the size used in competitions with my compound bow. How big are these?

I wasn't able to find any reliable information online. When

The more highly the Bow Weight, is the flight curve of the arrow all the flatter. This is very important with the long haul distances. Beginners must lead itself to the high Bow Weights slowly near.

is the language used, I have a hard time believing the source.

Finding information about what recurve archers shoot at is easy as it's an Olympic discipline. But a 122 cm target at 70 m is absolutely ridiculous for compounds.

The only statement from a reputable source (in proper English) I was able to find is:

The compound target is 80cm in diameter with a 10 ring 8cm in diameter. In international competition, compound targets only include the yellow, red and blue rings. This is to reduce the size of target mat needed for each target face, in order that each athlete has their own target to shoot at.

(https://worldarchery.org/Target-Archery)

Is this information correct? Does the outer blue ring have a diameter of 80 cm or would the outer white ring have a diameter of 80 cm if it was there?


Edit:

After reading World Archery's statement again, I noticed that I should be able to figure this out given the information and graphics they provide on the page I linked to.

I measured the 10 ring of the "target center" graphic to be 86 px in diameter and the outer blue ring to be 516 px in diameter.

10 cm / (86 px) * 516 cm = 60 cm

So under the assumption that they are referring to only the "target center" when stating that "[the] compound target is 80cm in diameter", this leads to a contradiction because 60 cm ≠ 80 cm.

But on the full FITA target they provided, I measured the 10 ring to be 91 px in diameter and the 1 ring to be 905 px in diameter.

10 cm / (91 px) * 905 px = 99.45 cm

This again leads to a contradiction because 99.45 cm ≠ 80 cm.

So even though the information seems to stem from a reputable source, it's ambiguous, has only two interpretations, and both of them contradict other information presented on the same page.

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