31

Yes, they can. Example: During the 2012 UEFA Champions League final, Manuel Neuer of Bayern Munich took a penalty against Chelsea, when the game went into penalties. Please refer this wikipedia link. Also, when a game is being decided by penalties, then all players must have taken one penalty each, before a player can take a second penalty. So, a goal ...


29

The accepted answer is great but I might add that in kicks from the penalty mark to decide a winner, all eligible players need to have taken a kick before a player may take a second kick. This means that the goalkeeper not only can take a kick, but must take a kick before any of the other players take a second kick.


26

When Neuer left the German's penalty area, Germany were already losing 1-0 and going out of the World Cup. By effectively becoming an extra outfield player, he increased the chance of Germany scoring the goal they needed to draw the match and stay in the World Cup. It didn't work, but that doesn't mean it wasn't the right thing to try. A famous similar ...


15

According to Law 3 of FIFA Laws of the game. Any of the other players may change places with the goalkeeper, provided that: the referee is informed before the change is made the change is made during a stoppage in the match I could not find mention of the changing of the jersey, but as per custom, usually the goalie in indicated by wearing a different ...


13

IFAB's Law on indirect free kick offences says that [a] goalkeeper is considered to be in control of the ball when: the ball is between the hands or between the hand and any surface (e.g. ground, own body) or by touching it with any part of the hands or arms except if the ball rebounds accidentally from the goalkeeper or the goalkeeper has made a ...


10

Of course it's legal and has happened many times other than the accepted answer's example. E.g José Luis Chilavert used to take penalties that were not even in penalty shoot-outs, as well as free kicks. See: Jose Luis Chilavert's international goals (YouTube).


9

The IFAB issued a clarifiying statement on the matter. There has been much debate about whether, at a goal kick, the goalkeeper is permitted to ‘lift’ the ball to a team mate to head or chest it back to the goalkeeper to catch and then put into play. The views of technical and refereeing experts about whether this is within the ‘spirit’ of the Laws is ...


8

In the Laws of the Game, Law 12 - Fouls and Misconduct says the following (emphasis mine on first bullet): A direct free kick is awarded if a player commits any of the following offences: handles the ball deliberately (except for the goalkeeper within their penalty area) Holds an opponent impedes an opponent with contact spits at an ...


7

Jens Lehmann did it before (National keeper before Neuer) when he scored for Schalke 04 against Dortmund. And here are a few more international ones and this is from my team's league. It is a common tactic when you're behind and need the goal. Especially when another goal against you wouldn't matter anyway you try to get an extra on-field player by doing ...


6

That's correct. Handling the ball a 2nd time with no other player touching it would lead to an indirect free kick. Law 12: An indirect free kick is awarded if a goalkeeper, inside their penalty area, commits any of the following offences: (...) touches the ball with the hands after: releasing it and before it has touched another player ...


6

An better example than Manuel Neuer would be Jörg Butt: "Known for taking penalty kicks, he scored 26 goals in the Bundesliga." Source


6

Yes, it is legal - and as someone already claimed, even required if all other players have taken theirs. To give some examples: Manuel Neuer converted a penalty for Bayern Munich against Real Madrid (?) in the Champions League quite recently. There are also goalkeepers who take penalties during the game, such as Hans-Jörg Butt, who converted a penalty for ...


5

Law 12 - Fouls and Misconduct, Section 2 - Indirect Free Kick outlines when a goalkeeper may not deliberately handle the ball1 in their own penalty area. An indirect free kick is awarded if a goalkeeper, inside their penalty area, commits any of the following offences: ... touches the ball with the hands after: releasing it and before ...


5

This is based on FIFA World Cup squads as listed on Wikipedia. (So it also depends on the accuracy of the data on Wikipedia.) In connection with this, I should mention that for some players age and birth date is completely missing or only year is shown. (This is mainly the case for earlier World Cups. Since sixties, these data seem to be more-or-less ...


5

From the 2013-2014 FIFA Laws of the Game, p. 120 ... A goalkeeper is considered to be in control of the ball: while the ball is between his hands or between his hand and any surface (e.g. ground, own body) while holding the ball in his outstretched open hand while in the act of bouncing it on the ground or tossing it into the air ...


4

One simple answer: VAR. As it is still a new technology, referees are unsure of the extent they should review decisions. In the past, when VAR was not used, referees were free of blame (to some extent) as the decision had to be made on the spot. However, as they are now allowed to review any major decision, they are now being criticized for not using it ...


4

I should preface this by a disclaimer that I am by not means expert, just a regular fan who occasionally watches a game. You can often see Manuel Neuer playing outside of penalty box, basically in the position where you typically see one of defenders - even in normal situations, not only near the end of a match. See also Style of play section of the ...


4

Neither of the two suggested restarts are correct. The correct restart is a kick-off. The Laws would explicitly state that a goal was to be disallowed for either of these offences, just as it does for Laws 3.7 and 3.9, if that was what was intended. Just to clarify, if a substitute enters the field of play and does not interfere with play, they are ...


3

In your case it will probably be equal. Don't underestimate how much a goalie's knee is being strained. The recovery time is the biggest key for an injury like that. If it's equal, then they will both return to the pitch at the same time. Like you already figured, an injury like that must be fully healed (or it will break again). If it's a simple muscle ...


3

What you have described it not a trick, nor is it illegal. The first player has simply played an aerial pass to another defender. This is not a deliberate trick to circumvent the Law. The second player has simply headed an aerial ball back to the goalkeeper, at a height that a player would be reasonably expected to head the ball. This is not a deliberate ...


3

Law 3, part 4 of the IFAB Laws of the Game is straightforward and covers the first three points directly. Any of the players may change places with the goalkeeper if: the referee is informed before the change is made the change is made during a stoppage in play Law 4, part 3 requires that [e]ach goalkeeper must wear colours that are ...


3

Quoting from this FiveThirtyEight article, itself quoting Donald Morrison: "If you pull the goalie with two and a half minutes to go, you have a 19 to 20 percent chance of tying the game" That's a model rather than empirical data based on actual games, but certainly gives us some sort of idea as to a success rate.


3

As has been pointed out, the goalkeeper may only deliberately handle the ball within their own penalty area. Furthermore, if the goalkeeper attempts to score a goal with their hands in the opponents' penalty area - as is likely in the scenario you have posed - not only would a direct free kick be awarded, but the goalkeeper would also be cautioned (shown ...


3

The answer to this deals with the flow of the game, and specifically rule 63 "delay of game penalty" The explanation starts on page 88 and describes that a goaltender may use his equipment in the defensive zone other than to intentionally delay the game in so far as he is being "checked" or influenced to do so by an opponent. A goal tender may not play ...


3

Four teams (France, Belgium, Czechoslovakia and Greece) used their three goalkeepers: In all, only four teams have ever used three goalkeepers in a single World Cup tournament. That's out of 371 teams to have qualified for the finals – surely time for Fifa to change the rules. First to use a trio of keepers were France in 1978. The No1 was ...


3

There already is an answer which provides several occurrences of this happening. (And which probably is complete until the source of that answer was published, which is shortly before 2010 FIFA World Cup.) Let us collect collaboratively in this community wiki answer other occurrences that we are able to find. At 2018 FIFA World Cup, Saudi Arabia used all ...


2

Your question is somewhat ambiguous. Not counting youth tournaments such as the U-17 and U-20 World Cups, the youngest goalkeeper ever to start in a World Cup was Cecilia Santiago of Mexico, born 19 October 1994, in a 1–1 draw vs. England on 27 June 2011. She was 16 years and 251 days old. At least one fifteen-year-old goalkeeper has sat on the bench in a ...


2

Ball in Play Yes - The goalkeeper may score a goal with his feet from directly inside the goalkeeper’s penalty area when holding a ball in play. Law 10 The Method of Scoring ... A goal is disallowed if the goalkeeper of the attacking team throws or hits the ball intentionally with his hand or arm from inside his own penalty area and is the last ...


1

In short: The rulebook has changed since the World Cup was played. This years Women's World Cup is being played under the 2019/20 Laws of the Game which have some significant changes from the previous 2018/19 edition. In particular, Law 14 Penalty Kicks now says that The goalkeeper must have at least part of one foot on/in-line with the goal line when ...


1

Unauthorized marks don't require the ref to interrupt the game as you have already quoted from the LotG, so scoring a goal is completely fine. After that, the player can be cautioned. The ball is out of play when the goal is scored. The goal is good, because offenses preventing the goal from being good are the ones that have to be called right away. If the ...


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